My Kingdom for a Better Sales Pitch

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bigstock-Man-Standing-On-Street-Is-Aski-132268082A political fund-raising call I got the other day ended very badly. No, not because I wound up screaming at the caller, or even because I didn’t contribute.

It ended badly because the organization almost lost my contribution by boring me with a bland, “one size fits all” script and forcing me to go on-line afterwards to contribute, rather than letting the caller easily send me a follow up email.

The same happens all the time with B2B sales campaigns. Here’s what went wrong and how voters, and customers, could more easily vote with their wallets.

The Rigid Sales Script

I got the political fund-raising call when I was 1) busy working and 2) out of the country and thus charged mega-bucks for every minute of phone time. I tried to tell the caller I was interested but couldn’t take the call, and even offered my email address as a sincere expression of interest.

But the telemarketer sounded completely confused and continued with what was obviously a pre-programmed spiel. I wound up, unfortunately, hanging up on him. The script from which he was working, and his call center system, probably wouldn’t let him easily grab my email and send a follow up note with an easy link to contribute.

I wound up finding the organization’s Web site and contributing, but someone less motivated wouldn’t have. In addition, my call will be recorded as a “hang up” (and a failure) rather than a success (by reminding me of an organization I chose to contribute to.) That makes it harder for this political organization to track the effectiveness of its call banks vs. email or other communication channels, or to link my contribution to the call.

The One Size Fits All Script

The second mistake was that the “sales pitch” began with a general, high-level reference to themes from the previous night’s convention coverage. But just as product pitches need to tell me exactly how the product will help me, this call never got specific. What would have been even more compelling would be something like this:

As you know, funding for the endangered sea turtle will be a critical issue in the next Congress.  Rep. Joe Kelp in Maine’s 2nd congressional district is head of the natural resources subcommittee that will vote on such funding early next year, and is in a tight race with his challenger, Harriet Treecutter. We need only another $125,000 to fund a targeted direct-mail campaign to the 30,000 swing voters who can keep Kelp in this important chairmanship and move this funding forward next year. We’re currently $78,000 of the way there. Will you move us forward with another $50 contribution? If so, we’ll update you in three weeks with the results of the campaign.

And how would the organization know I care about the sea turtle? That’s where all the Big Data, micro-segmentation of voters we keep hearing about comes in. If you know what I care about (as a voter or a tech buyer) tell me very specifically what my contribution (or purchase) will do based on my specific desires.

The Turn-Off Follow-Up

Since contributing, I get almost daily emails form this group with subject lines like “BRUTAL loss,” “DANGEROUSLY behind,” and (which I love) “you haven’t answered.” Even in this election year, the sky can’t be calling every day – and it’s not my job to answer unsolicited emails.

What might get more contributions out of me would be an update on the results of the previous voter turnout campaign I helped fund. Tell me how the polls have turned, how many committed voters you have registered, and exactly how you would use my next contribution to make more progress.

In the B2B world, effective follow up means finding out if the customer is using the product, getting value from it, and is aware of how specific add-ons or upgrades could make them more money. For solutions sold in the cloud, sellers can track usage patterns, social media comments and other feedback to tailor their follow-up to each customer, suggesting products and services geared to their specific needs.

But as both an IT customer, and an involved voter, I keep seeing clumsy, unfocused and just plain irrelevant offers. In these days of Big Data and personalized messaging, why can’t we do better?

Author: Bob Scheier
Visit Bob's Website - Email Bob
I'm a veteran IT trade press reporter and editor with a passion for clear writing that explains how technology can help businesses. To learn more about my content marketing services, email bob@scheierassociates.com or call me at 508 725-7258.

What? You Skipped These In Your Case Study?

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content marketing think like publisherWhile revising a series of case studies for a global IT services company, I found myself asking them over and over:

  • What did you do for your client that was different or better than what either the client or your competitors could have done?
  • How did your work help your client’s bottom line?

These two seemingly obvious questions were often very hard for the “in the trenches” account and project managers to answer. But without that context, any case study is just a “so what?” list of tasks you accomplished. Here’s what’s worked for me in making these case studies matter to prospects.

Why We’re Better

Account and project managers are stuck in the weeds because they’re paid to meet internal processes and delivery goals. To them, implementing an application upgrade, server refresh or shift to an offshore location are successes in and of themselves. The business-level benefits (such as cutting software licensing costs, speeding problem resolution or reducing support costs) are often hammered out several layers above them and long before they started work.
As a result, when I ask “Why are you better?” I hear things like:

  • “Global delivery of seamless service for database, compute, storage, network and applications…”
  • “Performed on-time and on-budget migration of Microsoft Exchange 2003 to Exchange 2010, VPN upgrades, XP to Windows 7 and self-service password reset…”
  • “In Q! completed offshoring of Level 1 and Level 2 services to Mumbai, Prague and the Philippines for 24/7 help desk coverage…

By repeatedly asking a) specifically what they did differently than others and b) the specific process-level benefits of their work, I can often drive them to cough up more useful details. For example:

  • “Using our proprietary transition methodology, we provided global delivery of seamless service for database, compute, storage, network and applications…” in half the time competitors had promised in their proposal.
  • Using our custom configuration scripts and customized server imaging tools, we “performed on-time and on-budget migration of Microsoft Exchange 2003 to Exchange 2010,
    VPN upgrades, XP to Windows 7 and self-service password reset…” without interruptions to applications or employee productivity.
  • The intensive pre-engagement training of our staff in the client’s systems allowed us, in half the time the customer expected, to “complete offshoring of Level 1 and Level 2 services to Mumbai, Prague and the Philippines for 24/7 help desk coverage…”

How It Helped

It’s also important to dig for quantifiable details about how the service engagement paid off to the business. The first time through, I’ll often hear vague descriptions such as:

  • “Transformation of server, network and application pillars increased agility and optimized operational costs.”
  • “Moving from siloed SLAs to a scalable business services model aligned IT and the business.”
  • “Automation-related efficiencies led to reduced demand, greater performance and improved agility.”

By pushing for a) definitions of these terms and b) quantification of the business benefits we can come closer to something like:

  • “Virtualizing the client’s servers, networks and applications allowed the client to scale their servers 2,000 percent to meet the holiday crunch. Our timely completion of a mobile app generated $2.5 million in additional revenue. Reducing the number of physical devices saved $125,000 in one time equipment upgrade fees and $50,000 a year in heating, cooling, space and management costs.”
  • “Rather than siloed SLAs that track the performance of only part of the IT infrastructure, our business services model lets senior executives track how essential business services (such as order tracking and customer support) are operating. This lets them focus IT spending on the areas most critical to the business.”
  • “Automation in areas ranging from password reset to server monitoring reduced the number of trouble tickets by 46%, increased availability from 97.6 to 99.99 percent, and made it easier to roll out upgrades to their CRM system.”

The earlier in the content production process you can get detailed answers like this, the sooner your internal, or external, writer can turn out compelling case studies. If you can’t get this quality of answer, ask yourself if it’s worth doing the case study at all.

Author: Bob Scheier
Visit Bob's Website - Email Bob
I'm a veteran IT trade press reporter and editor with a passion for clear writing that explains how technology can help businesses. To learn more about my content marketing services, email bob@scheierassociates.com or call me at 508 725-7258.

Overusing “Transformation”

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Transformation, or just flabby marketing?

Everywhere from interior decorating to education to healthcare, everyone’s claiming they deliver “transformation.”

But when it comes to  selling information technology and services, is the “T” word an effective value promise, or a vague buzzword that sets both the buyer and seller up for trouble?

I’m curious to hear from other marketers about how your customers respond to the term, and whether it helps deliver more and better prospects.

Definition, Please

According to the Oxford English dictionary, the primary definition of “transform” is “to change the form of; to change into another shape or form; to metamorphose,” with a secondary definition of “to change in character or condition; to alter in function or nature.” (Emphasis added.)

It is this second definition I think most people assume, and that gets marketers into trouble. It implies not incremental improvement but a fundamental, wide-ranging improvement that lasts.

Consider the idea of a “transformational” president. Franklin Roosevelt made the cut in the 1930s, some argue, by changing “the basic assumptions of national politics for a generation or more” in favor of a greater role for the federal government. You could argue Ronald Reagan was “transformational” in the opposite direction. Whatever your politics, both changes met the “transformational” criteria of being fundamental, wide ranging and lasting.

In a totally different vein, “Transformational Weight Loss” implies (and it seems the author tries to deliver) lasting improvement loss through fundamental, wide-ranging changes in lifestyle and attitude, not just in diet.

Transformation that doesn’t make the cut, I’d argue, is the South Carolina Department of Public Education’s “Office of School Transformation” whose goal is “to change the structure of schools to better serve students.” Their Web site seems to promise only tweaks to improve existing processes. Useful and valuable perhaps, but not transformation.

Are We Overselling “Transformation?”

In my own IT field, respected researcher Gartner advised outsourcing firms to ban the use of both  “transformation” and “innovation” because “they will only lead to misaligned expectations.”  For example, Gartner said, an outsourcer might lose money trying to solve problems it never agreed to tackle, while the customer wastes time and effort without achieving their goals. Or, “a customer might choose the lowest-priced provider and be left wondering where the innovation and transformation are.”

For what it’s worth, my small survey of PR and marketing respondents showed 40 percent agreed that transformation is a “fundamental, wide-ranging improvement that will last over time.” But a third believed marketers just throw the word around without thinking, and 22 percent said marketers use transformation as a synonym for “improve.”

In your experience, do customers get a warm and fuzzy feeling from the word “transformation” and click through to learn more? Or do they drop out of the sales funnel (or complain after the purchase) when they find transformation has been oversold?

Author: Bob Scheier
Visit Bob's Website - Email Bob
I'm a veteran IT trade press reporter and editor with a passion for clear writing that explains how technology can help businesses. To learn more about my content marketing services, email bob@scheierassociates.com or call me at 508 725-7258.

Differentiating Local IT Service Shops

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Logicalis US does a good job of presenting short, sweet customer “stories” on its home page (with links to full case studies, of course.)

A lot of local and regional IT “solution” providers I work with have a self-esteem issue. When I ask “What differentiates you from your competitors?” they say “Nothing.”

“We just do what everyone else does – install and manage networks, do user support, plan upgrades, execute cloud migrations,” they say. Or, “We try to listen to our customer needs and tailor a solution to them – you know, what everyone does.” Or, “we try to provide good service, but everyone does…our only advantage is we’re local and can get to the customer in half an hour.”

They’re selling themselves short. Every business – every business – has something unique to offer or it wouldn’t exist. Don’t believe me? Read on.

Commodity? Fughedaabout It.  

  • Chain gas station/convenience store:  Even the humblest, no-name, most run-down gas station/snack shop has at least one unique attribute, which is its location.  When a customer needs gas or coffee now location is critical. The same is true of a local IT service provider, and rather than shrugging it off as “our only advantage” you can play it up. (See details below.)
  • Donut/coffee shop: Here in Boston, we seem to have a Dunkin’ Donuts coffee shop every quarter mile. The ultimate commodity experience, right? But I have friends who swear “their” Dunkin’ makes better coffee than the one down the street. Maybe it’s really the cleanliness or the friendliness of the staff or how fast the drive-through line moves. It doesn’t matter because the customer perceives it as better. And even if other coffee shops across town offer the same clean floor and smiling employees, each shop competes only with those within easy walking or driving distance of their clientele.  (Again, IT service providers take note.)
  • Handyman: There must be hundreds, if not thousands, of folks who handle odd householder repair jobs in the Boston area. But we stick with one fellow who is 1) exceptionally creative at solving tough problems in our more than 200-year-old house, 2) is meticulous in his craftsmanship, 3) is reasonably priced and 4) shows up when he says he will. (Yes, he is booked solid, and no, you can’t have his number.) As a local IT service provider, you probably share one or more of these winning traits. If so, tout them.

Now, Tell Your Story

How do we turn these elements of differentiation into compelling content for a “commodity” local IT service provider? Through stories other prospective customers can relate to. For example:

  • The location advantage: “When the point of sale system crashed at a local party supply store the week before Halloween, the screams about lost sales were for real. Because we were located just across town, we had a technician on site within 30 minutes and the system back up in another hour – just in time for the Saturday afternoon sales crush.”
  • The customer service/creativity advantage: “The staff at a local commercial insurance agency found themselves struggling with the new customer service portal rolled out by one of their most popular insurance providers. While training was not part of our existing service offering, we quickly learned the portal, provided training to their staff and wrote custom scripts to integrate it with our client’s CRM and accounting systems. Our client’s staff can nowfocus on business, not learning the new portal, and is even using the new portal to provide special discounts and mobile service to their customers.”
  • The “we know your business” advantage: “A local hospital we support was struggling with the shift from the ICD-9 to ICD-10 codes for classifying diseases and treatments. Training their staff on the new codes was hard enough. They had no time or skills to tackle the associated changes to their applications and databases. With our deep understanding of the hospital’s IT infrastructure (much of which we deployed) we were able to handle the technical side of the upgrade with minimal fuss and cost. We even deployed analytic software to help them recover revenue they were missing due to mis-coded treatments.”

Needed: Happy Customers

The best proof of your value is always a real customer, with a name and a face, describing what you do well in their own words. Logicalis US, a global service provider, is among those who do it well (see screen shot above.) If you’re not asking your best local customers for referrals, now’s the time to start. And remember: Just because you’re small and local doesn’t mean you’re not special.

Author: Bob Scheier
Visit Bob's Website - Email Bob
I'm a veteran IT trade press reporter and editor with a passion for clear writing that explains how technology can help businesses. To learn more about my content marketing services, email bob@scheierassociates.com or call me at 508 725-7258.

Content Cookbook #2: Selling Security Response

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(One in an ongoing series of sample IT drip content marketing campaigns. Feel free to steal this sequence or, if you’d like Content marketing security response sequence help customizing one for your needs, email or call at 781 599-3262.)

Antivirus products are “doomed to failure.” So says, of all people, Symantec, even though it gets 40% of its revenue from AV.

What’s up? For one thing, AV not a huge money maker. Second, hackers have moved on from endpoint attacks using viruses. The most serious threats now come from “zero day” network intrusion and denial of service attacks that target the core of the IT infrastructure and are too new to be caught by AV scans. As a result, Symantec and other vendors are trying to sell software and services that help customers limit the damage from attack.

If you’re selling security response services what sequence of marketing content can help you to identify and rate prospects for those services?

Story One: This captures prospects early in the sales cycle by clearly explaining the limits of AV, the nature of the new threats AV cannot stop and how security response, rather than prevention, can help limit the damage. Be honest about whether antivirus is really “dead” or is just not sufficient, in and of itself, to provide security. Get specific with recommendations without touting your product. Should customers, for example, just get basic free AV for end points and focus the rest of their efforts on hardening the core and on security response? If they shift more security spending to the network, specifically where should they invest? And what is the ROI of security response versus prevention?

Offer this content free and promote the heck out of it via emails and social networks. Repurpose it for videos, ebooks, blog posts, contributed op-ed pieces and Webinars. This is your chance to become the trusted voice of reason on this topic. The call to action (CTA) is a link to the more detailed stories 2 and 3 which are aimed at more specific market segments.

Story 2: Focuses on one subset of your target market with specialized content. To find SMB prospects, for example, produce a checklist they can use to determine whether this shift from prevention to response is true for them as well as for large companies. If basic AV is still necessary, what are the “must-have” features an SMB in particular should focus on? And if SMBs should start thinking “response” rather than just prevention, what are the basic “response” steps an SMB should take themselves, given their limited budgets, and what can best be done by an outside vendor?

Gate this content with two to three basic contact/qualification questions, such as name, business email and top security challenge they are facing. The CTA is a link to story three, pulling prospects further through the sales funnel to the product/vendor evaluation.

Story 3: To capture prospects that are in the “consideration” stage of the purchase process, offer tips for evaluating the security response services that are flooding the marketplace. Which of the services they are selling, such as centralized real-time monitoring or documentation and forensics of past attacks are most valuable? What of the incident response workflows they are offering will help limit the damage from each type of attack most effectively? What security response steps should a customer take themselves, and which should they leave to a service provider? What are some of the “gotchas” that could hurt a customer by choosing the wrong provider, and how can they avoid these mistakes?

Gate this content with two or three further progressive profiling questions, such as whether they have (or plan to) create a security response plan and their time frame for action. If you can combine this with third-party data to further qualify them, all the better. If they plan to act soon, the call to action could be a sales call to further discuss their response needs. If they’re months away from action, offer them a subscription to your email newsletter of security response tips, tracking their readership to determine if and when they might be open to a call.

Note: In place of each “story” in this sequence feel free to replace with “webinar”, “video”, “podcast”, “white paper”, or other format.) And if you have a product or service for which you’d like to see a sample, drop me a line or call at 781 599-3262.

Author: Bob Scheier
Visit Bob's Website - Email Bob
I'm a veteran IT trade press reporter and editor with a passion for clear writing that explains how technology can help businesses. To learn more about my content marketing services, email bob@scheierassociates.com or call me at 508 725-7258.
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Man with black mask in studioBuilding personas (profiles of the customers you most want to sell to) is like flossing. You know you should do it, but it always seems to be too much time and trouble. Besides, you’re not sure it’s that it’s worthwhile.

If that sounds like you, take a lunch break to watch this 30-minute video from the MarketingSherpa Internet Marketing Webinar Archive. It describes how IHS, a global provider of B2B market data, got measurable boosts to sales from its use of personas. Just as importantly, it’s full of specific tips for how to perform good persona “hygiene” without staying up half the night.

And it’s one of those well-done presentations that’s actually fun to watch.

First, the challenge. IHS was getting hundreds of thousands of site visitors per month, said Senior Director of Demand Management Byron O’Dell, but relatively few were doing anything but looking at the top-level pages. Like many, if not all, B2B companies IHS needed to convert those visitors into more qualified leads.

Now, the results: From the first half to the second half of 2013, IHS estimates marketing’s contribution to its aerospace and defense business revenue rose 83%. (Note that’s not increases to Web hits, downloads or even sales calls, but revenue.) O’Dell gives credit to a content marketing and lead gen program built around the unique needs of six primary personas, supplemented by about 20 secondary personas.

Getting Granular 

IHS’s marketing and product management teams created six personas, based on their experience with customers as well as data from the company’s CRM system. Only then did it take it to the busy sales teams.

The sales folks, who understand best how deals actually get done, suggested adding more detail to the mix by adding about another 20 “secondary personas.”  For example, under the single primary “Military/government planning and strategy” persona, sales recommended creating one sub-persona of “strategy and planning” professionals and another sub-persona of “research and development” prospects.

PersonasThis is important because each persona is supposed to represent a group with unique content needs. I’d guess, for example, that someone in planning and strategy has a need for shorter-term market predictions than does someone in research and development. Under the “Media/Advertising/PR” persona IHS was smart to create “Reporter/media” and “advertising” sub-personas. For reporters, IHS might want to highlight the free statistics they can provide in return for media exposure. For advertising agencies, it might want to push case studies about the value of their custom, paid research.

Step by Step

Rather than wait until they had the perfect, global persona-based strategy, O’Dell didn’t stop doing “batch and blast” content marketing while he developed his personas. He simply added the more granular, persona-based offers where they made sense and as his team developed them.

IHS also had the patience to map out a sequential approach to what content they would offer each “persona” based on their past behavior. For example, they sent everyone in one persona an email offering a white paper with an overview of its forecasts for the simulation and training market over the next ten years. Only those who downloaded the white paper, though, received a follow-up asking if they’d like to book a demo of their online data analysis service.

“We saw great conversion between those two steps,” said O’Dell, with those scheduling a demo turning out to be “high quality leads.” If someone clicks on a button asking for a demo, he says, there’s “noting ambiguous” about their interest.

IHS also didn’t turn prospects off by asking them to identify their persona and sub-persona through a lengthy qualification “gate” in their first interaction. It was only after the third week of the campaign that IHS asked for detailed answers that identified their sub-persona. By that time, after seeing some of HIS’s more valuable content, about half volunteered the extra information. It also used outside databases to pre-fill some of the prospect’s content info to reduce their workload.

The Angels Are in the Details

The IHS approach makes sense to me because it mirrors how I want to research products. I need the provider to prove their value before I give up too much information or agree to a sales call. And I’ll most likely to respond to a pitch that reflects my specific needs and interests.

Secondary personas help prevent you from spamming prospects with vague or irrelevant content. But for those of you out there using personas, are secondary personas just too much work?

Author: Bob Scheier
Visit Bob's Website - Email Bob
I'm a veteran IT trade press reporter and editor with a passion for clear writing that explains how technology can help businesses. To learn more about my content marketing services, email bob@scheierassociates.com or call me at 508 725-7258.

How to Be Your Own Trade Pub

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Insert your insights here...

Insert your insights here…

The brutal mugging of the trade press at the hands of the Internet has meant fewer opportunities to place news story or opinion pieces. A recent post by Katherine Griwert at the Content Marketing Institute shows how to attract prospects to your site by publishing industry news on your own.

She cites security-as-a-service provider ProofPoint Inc., which faced challenges I often see with my clients. ProofPoint needed more content to boost their search ranking, their customers “weren’t always responsive when we ask what they want to learn and there’s only so much one can add to a site’s core products section,” said Director of Market Development Keith Crosley.

In response, ProofPoint added industry news to an existing white paper and weekly blog strategy, and assigned internal writers to generate ideas for articles based on news about around issues such as “data loss prevention” and “email security.” Results included a page rank that matches that of companies with several times its revenue, with organic search traffic rising 18 percent quarter over quarter, and news-related posts generating thousands of unique page views among organic search visitors.

Not Just News, Commentary

As Griwert points out, just re-posting industry news won’t draw as many readers (or impress your prospects) as much as explaining to them why it is important or telling them what they should do in response to it.  (For more on when and how to add value to content, read my ebook.)

For proof, look to cloud-based phone provider ShoreTel Sky, which found a 42 percent higher conversion rate among site visitors who read news content than those who read product promotional content. One of their tactics was to report on a story about what doesn’t belong in the cloud, and then explain why phone systems like theirs do belong in the cloud. This is a favorite tactic of mine: Gain instant credibility by admitting the weaknesses of your approach and explaining, by contrast, where it works best.

Other good ways to turn raw headlines from the Web into good content:

Explain why the reader should care: What trend does it illustrate, what opportunity does it uncover, and which dangers does it warn about? For example: “This wave of ‘software-defined storage’ announcements shows how much confusion there is around the term. This is an early-stage industry that promises great benefits, but needs to shake out before it is real.”

 Explain what the reader should do: “When reading about `software-defined storage’ be sure to look past the buzzword and ask how each offering meets your specific needs, such as scalability, availability and avoiding a single point of failure.”

 Explain what the original story missed and how that affects the reader: “Each of these announcements talk about software-defined storage without integrating it to the broader  software-defined data center. What good is software-defined storage if it’s a silo I need to manage apart from my servers and storage?”

 Expand on the story/explain the trend with an anecdote:  “I was talking with a client the other day who said `software defined storage’ is B.S. He says it’s nothing but a fancy term for storage virtualization, which has never proved its worth. This got me thinking about where we fell short with storage virtualization and where the industry needs to go from here…”

 And how do you tie the stories you write to the products or services you sell? The answer: Only when it’s justified. If in doubt, deliver smarts and insight to your readers, not a drumbeat about your most recent product release. When your product or service is a natural fit for a post, story, mention its advantages briefly with a link to an offer page, but don’t overdo it.

For example, here’s how I would do it for this post: If you’d like an editor’s help developing news content or an editorial calendar for your site, feel free to be in touch.

Author: Bob Scheier
Visit Bob's Website - Email Bob
I'm a veteran IT trade press reporter and editor with a passion for clear writing that explains how technology can help businesses. To learn more about my content marketing services, email bob@scheierassociates.com or call me at 508 725-7258.
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Back in the ‘80s, rockabilly giant Sleepy LaBeef recorded a song called “It Ain’t What You Eat (It’s the Way How You Chew It). Sadly, even Google can’t find it now, but I recall one of the lines was “It ain’t what you do, it’ the way how you do it.”

When it comes to marketing automation that means it’s not only what you do that’s important, but how you manage and measure it. Which is just what The Pedowitz Group and The Lenskold Group learned in a recent survey of more than 370 B2B marketing organizations. It found that marketing automation, combined with tracking ROI metrics such as lead acceptance rate and revenue per sale, made top-performing organizations more efficient and effective.

 

Top Performers

According to the survey, the top segment of companies – 11% of all marketers surveyed – demonstrated distinct advantages in outgrowing competitors by adopting integrated marketing automation and using ROI metrics. After deploying a marketing automation solution, 48 percent of marketing organizations saw an increase in lead acceptance, the survey found, while 28 percent of organizations saw an increase in revenue per sale.

While “all the key outcomes went up,” total marketing revenue contribution rose the most “for the organizations that had marketing automation and were also using ROI metriecs to help manage their effectiveness,” said  Lenskold Group President Jim Lenskold.

Key Success Factors

The importance of management showed up again in findings that the organizations that reported the most success were:

  • More likely to report strengths in their organizations’ structure and processes related to lead generation;
  • Three times more likely to drive repeatable and predictable lead-to-sale conversion rates; and,
  • Better able to manage their marketing funnel, measuring incremental sales and revenue, providing a pipeline forecast and being accountable for revenue goals.

It all shows, as if we needed a reminder, that simply purchasing a marketing automation system isn’t enough to realize these benefits because systems don’t operate in a vacuum. At the end of the day, software is only a tool and using it effectively requires process improvements and adherence to best practices.

You can watch Lenskold and Debbie Qaqish, a principal at the Pedowitz Group, discuss the survey in more detail on CRM Software TV.

Author: Bob Scheier
Visit Bob's Website - Email Bob
I'm a veteran IT trade press reporter and editor with a passion for clear writing that explains how technology can help businesses. To learn more about my content marketing services, email bob@scheierassociates.com or call me at 508 725-7258.
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