PR/Marketing Writing Tips Archives

How to write a PR pitchA few months ago I offered some tips for ensuring emailed comments will make it into reporters’ stories. They include making sure your client answered the reporter’s questions (!), explained buzzwords and didn’t cite third-party sources that need further checking.

But what does a “good” response to a reporter’s question look like? I just happen to have an example — a piece I did for Computerworld analyzing how “software-defined everything” (IT infrastructure created and controlled by software) will affect outsourcing.

In my request for pitches, I specifically asked for sources to discuss:

  • How the rise in “software-defined everything” is affecting customers, especially their outsourcing plans.
  • How SDE affects which applications, workloads or business processes customers outsource.
  • Specific, actionable recommendations about which applications or workloads are best or least suited to “software-defined” environments?
  • And other trends customers should be aware of.

Fail #1: The Purely Self-Serving Pitch

“Bob. The movement toward IT outsourcing has spawned the (SDE) market. Service providers need to be able to customize their networks and deliver policy-based networking in order to meet customer demand, and (SDE) provides that capability. **** can comment on the role of (SDE) in enabling IT outsourcing…”

Did the PR pro explain how his client could answer my questions? No. Did he promise his client would talk about anything except how great his product or service was? No. Did I interview his client? No.

Fail #2: The Kinda Self-Serving Pitch

“****, CTO and co-founder of ****, a provider of Network Security as a Service, can talk about why he feels SD-WAN, in particular, is a short-sighted approach to solve network connectivity issues. For example, (he) argues that the cost of deploying SD-WAN to manage MPLS/Internet traffic would be better spent cracking the “middle mile” challenge. Further, (he) believes that a software-based approach to networking and security will make it easier and more cost-effective to manage.”

Again, this response tells me much more about what the client wants to promote (Network Security as a Service) than answering my questions. In the very last sentence, the pitch begins to touch on what I’m writing about, but doesn’t make the direct link to outsourcing I need. Again, I passed.

Success #1!: Answers

Hi, Bob.

The below response is from ****, co-chair of the ****. Let me know if this is along the lines of what you were looking for and if you would like to connect…

1) How the rise of “software-defined everything” is affecting customers’ IT plans in general, and their outsourcing strategies in particular. Response: Enterprise IT leaders see (SDE) as a core part of their strategy to reduce cost and improve agility improvement strategy. Every CIO is now examining if a cloud-first, partner-first approach is the best for their organization.

2) How “software-defined everything” affects which applications, workloads or business processes customers are outsourcing? Response: When application infrastructure is software based it becomes much easier to have supply chain and outsourcing partners take over tasks.  SDE opens the door for nearly every enterprise function to be outsourced.

3) Specific, actionable recommendations about which applications or workloads are most or least suited to “software-defined” environments. Response: Most Fortune 500s have legacy apps whose cost to port to a new infrastructure would be very high.  In those specific cases it’s better to port the data to a new cloud app.

4) And, of course, what upcoming trends or market developments customers should be on the lookout for. Response: One of the most exciting areas…is Software Defined Perimeter (SDP).  SDP allows enterprise to distribute workloads globally yet maintain full access control to applications, data and infrastructure for employees and partners.  Subsequently SDP enables SDE to happen.

I wound up interviewing this client, who turned out to be a key source for my story. Not only did he show he could address the questions, the specificity of his answers told me a phone conversation would be time well spent. He even introduced a new topic (software defined perimeter) that I hadn’t paid enough attention to before.

Next time a reporter asks for sources for a story, ask them for three or four sample questions, and make sure your client can answer them. If not, push back with hard questions until they do have something to say. If they don’t, tell them to pass on the interview – or at least not be shocked if they don’t wind up being quoted.

Author: Bob Scheier
Visit Bob's Website - Email Bob
I'm a veteran IT trade press reporter and editor with a passion for clear writing that explains how technology can help businesses. To learn more about my content marketing services, email bob@scheierassociates.com or call me at 508 725-7258.

Nailing Quotes for Reporters

editorial calendarsCongratulations – a reporter has agreed to interview one of your clients for a story. The bad news: Your client suddenly got too busy for an interview, but will answer emailed questions.

You probably review your client’s answers before passing them on to the reporter. But based on my recent experience, some PR pros aren’t looking for the right things – or not looking closely enough.

Check this “to-do” list to maximize your client’s chances of being quoted.

Did they actually answer the question?

You’d be amazed (or maybe not) at how many answers aren’t really answers. They’re discussions, musings, self-evident problem statements or thinly disguised marketing claims. Real answers have a “yes,” “no” or clearly defined “It all depends” statement.

If I ask “Is cloud computing safe for medical records?” don’t tell me “The safety of patient information in the cloud is an issue any responsible enterprise will need to consider carefully.” Instead, give me examples of how to tell when it is or isn’t safe, or examples of safe/unsafe data.

Did you spell out all acronyms and explain all terms?

One recent response said “(IT) automation has the inherent risk of creating a `black box’.”  It never described what the client meant by “black box” or what the risk is. I have a pretty good idea what they meant, but in an email (unlike an interview) I can’t easily clarify it. If I need to start another email thread to ask, under deadline, it cuts your chances of being quoted.

The same goes for acronyms, as in: “CNCF and other communities provide reference architectures…” If you told me this was “the Cloud Native Computing Foundation” an open source standards effort” I’d be much more likely to include it.

Did you attribute the response to a specific person with a title, not an amorphous organization?

Editors insist their reporter’s quote people, especially for in-depth, advice-oriented features.

Did you spell check the reply?

I know auto correct makes stupid mistakes, and that your client is in a rush. But sloppy grammar errors make me doubt the rest of the response as well.

Did you provide a three to six word description of your client so the writer can position them in the story?

Make sure these are short and specify whether your client sells hardware, software or services. Think “cloud security services provider” or “Salesforce configuration services provider.” Avoid vague, marketing-driven statements like “Acme Solutions helps enterprises worldwide maximize the value of their sales teams.”

Did you avoid stories, quotes, or examples from third parties?

“A 2016 Gartner report (quoted in InfoWorld) showed demand for data scientists will rise 20.7 per cent per year between 2016 and 2020.” This forces me to check if your client got the number right and if I or they have the right to reuse that figure. I also can’t quote a report in a competing publication. Better approach: Provide a link to only publicly accessible reports so I can cite them accurately, easily and with confidence.

Did you edit for clarity and conciseness?

Not everything has to be a super sound bite, but help your client by crisping up their writing. Here’s one example from Eric Turnquist, senior director of information technology at network monitoring and it management vendor Ipswitch, (not a client of mine.) My question was whether system administrators are still needed in a world of DevOps (combining development and operations to speed applications to market.)

“Traditional systems administrator skills will still be needed. There’s usually tribal knowledge around legacy systems – people that know the old systems because they were here when they were built – that is tough to replace. Everything hasn’t been completely migrated from those old systems…now you’re stuck with it and need folks with traditional skills to use that technology, or to finish migrating from it. Knowledge of traditional systems and the skills to use them will always be in demand for this reason.”

Do you review your clients’ responses to emailed reporters’ questions? If you push back for better answers, do they listen?

Author: Bob Scheier
Visit Bob's Website - Email Bob
I'm a veteran IT trade press reporter and editor with a passion for clear writing that explains how technology can help businesses. To learn more about my content marketing services, email bob@scheierassociates.com or call me at 508 725-7258.

When to Stop Nagging and Other PR Questions

how to pitch editors and bloggersWhat is the best way to pitch a writer – by phone or email? When should I stop calling to ask if you’ve seen my pitch? How much editorial control do vendors exercise over custom content sites?

Those were among the questions I got at a recent lunchtime talk at a Boston-area PR firm. I was invited to describe how I operate, as a blogger and free-lance writer, and how PR pros can work most effectively with folks like me.

For all of you who weren’t there for the pizza and my presentation (which you can download here,  complete with samples of PR pitches done right and wrong), here’s a synopsis:

Q: When is the best time to contact you with a pitch?

Q: There are no good or bad times, as my work schedule is completely unpredictable. Since I don’t cover a beat for a trade publication, or have a regular story submission schedule, there are no regular “deadlines” to work around. On the other hand, I often go from calm to overbooked within hours. What’s more important than the timing is the form of a pitch. (See question below.)

Q: What is the best way to contact you – email or phone?

A: Email. Phone calls are an intrusive interruption, no matter what I’m working on. Given the low likelihood a pitch will turn into an interview or, much less, a story the interruption usually isn’t worth my time, or, frankly, that of the PR person.

Q: What kind of story idea pitches are you interested in?

A: Right now, none. When I write for trade publications (click here to subscribe to my email update on such stories) it’s always based on an assignment from them. Pitching stories isn’t something I typically do, as it requires a lot of up-front work with an uncertain likelihood of a return. For other writers, though, that might not be the case. A quick email asking if they’re open to such story idea pitches, and what areas they’re most interested in, could be worthwhile.

Having said that, some vendor-sponsored sites such as TechBeacon (sponsored by HP Enterprise) ask writers to come up with a steady stream of story pitches in a specific area such as security or DevOps. The difference here is that the Web site promises a regular stream of work, as long as the writer does a good enough job pitching. To get your sources exposure on these sites, treat them like a trade pub: Monitor what your target editor and others are writing about on the site and pitch accordingly. If these sites offer a handy “trending” or “what’s popular” list all the better, as that shows you the topics the editors will want more coverage of.

Q: How much editorial control does the vendor have over a site they sponsor?

A: This varies based on the site and whether the aim is to generate high-level visibility and thought leadership or to generate short-term leads. In my experience, most vendors downplay their sponsorship and hire IT trade press veterans to run the site. They want the site to look and feel more like a trade pub than a marketing site, tracking what stories visitors read to generate profiles and score them as leads.

Q: How do we pitch ideas or sources to editors of such sites?

A: First, make sure your idea or source can provide information that is original, detailed and timely (download my content quality control check list here). Then, make sure your source isn’t a direct competitor of the site sponsor, or that their messaging doesn’t contradict that of the vendor. You wouldn’t want to, for example, pitch a story about the continued value of tape storage to a vendor that just dumped their tape business.

The good news: Some complementary vendors are featured regularly in such sites (see one example here.) If in doubt, this is one time where a detailed, specific query to the site editor is worthwhile and shows you’re doing your homework.

Q:  I emailed you a pitch and you didn’t respond. How often should I call to check for a response?

A: This was the toughest question and one where I was caught in a lie. My immediate response was “Don’t call or email me again – if I’m interested I’ll call you.”  But one of the PR pros reminded me that sometimes such nudges have reminded me of a good idea I overlooked at first glance, or of a source I didn’t need when first pitched but can use as my deadline looms.

Bottom line advice: If you really think your idea or source is strong, limit the nudging to one email per week, focusing specifically on why you think it’s a good fit and asking what, if anything, could make it stronger. Then it’s in the editor’s hands to be courteous enough to at least respond.

Even if we can’t do lunch, email me your questions about best PR practices (or anything else) and I’ll answer them in a future post.

Author: Bob Scheier
Visit Bob's Website - Email Bob
I'm a veteran IT trade press reporter and editor with a passion for clear writing that explains how technology can help businesses. To learn more about my content marketing services, email bob@scheierassociates.com or call me at 508 725-7258.

No Contact Info? Then Don’t Do a Press Release

how to write a press release There’s a one-sentence error that almost guarantees an editor, blogger or other influencer won’t call for more information, a chat with your CEO or enough details to write about your latest  announcement.

And I’m seeing more and more vendors making this mistake all the time.

The mistake is not in a sentence they include in the press release, but a sentence they leave out.

The missing info is, believe it or not, the name, phone number and email of a person to contact for more information.

Company to Press: Drop Dead?

PR and marketing folks are probably skipping this “For more information….” line because “press” is thought of as old-fashioned or downright obsolete, with bloggers and social media providing the faster path to awareness. Many companies are also cutting back on internal or external PR to save money and figure any calls aren’t worth their time.

Judging from the requests I keep getting for product and company briefings, I “press” exposure is still important. If you don’t agree, why go to the time and trouble of doing a press release at all? If the aim is to get people to notice you and write/blog/Tweet/podcast about you, why wouldn’t you want to make it as easy as possible for them to talk to you?

Even worse is, often, the lack of any easy to find press contact info on company Web sites. More and more, I need to drill deep into the general “Contact Us” page and even go through a drop-down list to find the “press contact” option. The harder you make it for a writer or editor to contact you, the more likely they’ll click through to a competitor who is easier to work with.

Your Real Readers

Remember also that the “press” has expanded far beyond full-time reporters working for name-brand trade or general interest pubs. For example, I’m doing a series for a vendor-sponsored Web site aimed at developers. It’s run by a former trade press editor, the methodology and sourcing are almost identical to common practice on trade pubs, and the stories are informational and objective, not vendor sales puffery.

For the sources I interview for such stories (such as recruiters and Web sites offering salary benchmarks) I’d bet the coverage on this site is just as valuable as if I were writing for a trade pub. It might even be more valuable, as it’s in the vendor’s interest to aggressively promote the content to the target audience. In any case, they seem happy with the links I’ve sent and are lining up to cooperate on future stories.

Given all that, I’m at a loss for why anyone would issue a press release without contact information. Any clues? And check out these other tips for beefing up your press releases.

Author: Bob Scheier
Visit Bob's Website - Email Bob
I'm a veteran IT trade press reporter and editor with a passion for clear writing that explains how technology can help businesses. To learn more about my content marketing services, email bob@scheierassociates.com or call me at 508 725-7258.

Five Phrases Could Have Saved This Pitch

How to write a PR pitchEvery day PR pros ask me to hear their clients describe how they’re unique in the marketplace. But their emails are often full of such meaningless, vague jargon that I can’t tell what, if anything, their client has to say.

So I delete their pitches, probably missing some good insights. That’s bad for me, bad for the PR pro, bad for the client.

Here are some recent yawners I’ve received, with suggested proof points and news hooks that might have made me sit down and take a phone call with the client:   

Yawners Proof points and hooks
“global” “Our 5,000 professionals work from 16 offices in North America, Europe and China and development centers in India and Mexico.”
“solutions integrator” “We provide everything from data center design to server racking to software configuration and training.”
“ transformation” “We reduce the cost of ERP/CRM cloud migration by an average of 35%, and the time to value by 40%.”
“…We blend best of breed and emerging technologies…” We find, test, implement and integrate the latest specialized testing tools so you can focus on application development and fast turnaround. ”
“….innovative accelerators…” “Our `pre-flight checklists’ for SaaS integration reduce migration time by an average of 20%, while our proprietary License Checker assures you’re getting the best deal.”

In each case, the added detail proves why the client is worth talking to and the specific areas they could comment on. Knowing they have offices in three continents proves they’re really global and not just hoping to be. Knowing they focus on ERP/CRM or cloud testing lets me know which future stories I should tap them for. Describing a tool like a “License Checker” makes me wonder how much a thing works and whether it might be worth a fun blog post.

P.S. Yes, all my suggestions are longer than the original text – but not horribly long. And the extra length is worth it if it keeps the reader engaged.

Author: Bob Scheier
Visit Bob's Website - Email Bob
I'm a veteran IT trade press reporter and editor with a passion for clear writing that explains how technology can help businesses. To learn more about my content marketing services, email bob@scheierassociates.com or call me at 508 725-7258.

Government Shutdown? Try Editorial Shutdown

how to handle customer reviews of trade press stories This week, a bunch of intelligent, well-meaning people managed to waste a lot of time and wind up frustrated.

No, I’m not talking about the government shutdown. (Remember, I said “intelligent and well-meaning people.”)

I’m talking about a smaller logjam you’ve probably all run into. It’s the question of whether, and how, a reference customer could review their quotes for a story in a trade publication. Because neither I, nor the customer, nor the PR firm involved was specific enough about what sort of review the customer would get, all three of us ended up spinning our wheels for no reason.

How We Got Here  

Here’s how it played out: The PR firm for a vendor put me in touch with an insightful, informed user at a prominent company. We had a great conversation, at the end of which he asked if he could review his comments before publication.

I checked with my editor, who said it was OK to send just the comments I would use, but not the entire story. So I spent an hour or so reviewing the source’s comments, pulling out and cleaning out what I thought usable, and sent them to him.

He replied that he and his internal teams needed to see the entire story to understand the points of view, how I was positioning the user’s company, what other sources I would quote, and “the context where the quotes would be used.”

While the user has generously offered to run at least one quote by his internal review process if I can put it in context, I (and the user, and the PR firm and vendor) won’t get nearly the value out of the interview we all should.

One Editor, Please

Sure, the user is right that context matters.  By clever positioning, a writer can make even an accurate quote make a customer look bad. But letting a source, in effect, edit the full written draft of a story opens unmanageable can of worms.

Suppose, for example, the user made an entirely valid point about the shortcomings of virtual private networks. Their legal department might say that implies their company’s security is weak and the comment has to go, even if it was accurate and presented in context. Or, how about if their PR department didn’t like the fact we quoted one of their competitors (again, accurately) in a way that made the competitor look like it had a competitive edge? How about if an analyst made a provocative prediction in paragraph four that made the customer, quoted in paragraph five, fear they’d be associated with something so negative?

Imagine the back and forth negotiations it would take to satisfy both the PR and legal teams in this one customer. Now, multiply that by the dozen or more sources I might quote in a story. Like the government, the editing process would pretty much shut down. What’s worse, once everyone sanitized and prettified their statements so no one could possibly take offense, the story would put readers to sleep and say nothing.

Can’t We All Get Along?

I’ve found a useful compromise (if my editors will go for it) is to read back direct quotes over the phone, with a verbal general description of where the quote fits in the story. For example: “In this section I describe the challenges of e-mail archiving, and this quote illustrates the pros and cons of deduplication.” That give the source a comfort level for what they’ll say and the context for it, without giving their legal and PR teams fishing rights to find other potential problems.

At the very least, it’s up to PR firms to ask reference customers exactly what level of spoken or written review they or their teams will require of quotes used in stories, and to make the reporter aware of those requirements before scheduling an interview.

Otherwise, you might find yourself compared to — horror of horrors — a member of Congress. Let me know what’s worked for you in avoiding quote review gridlock.

Author: Bob Scheier
Visit Bob's Website - Email Bob
I'm a veteran IT trade press reporter and editor with a passion for clear writing that explains how technology can help businesses. To learn more about my content marketing services, email bob@scheierassociates.com or call me at 508 725-7258.

Why Do Your Industry Trend Pitches Fall Flat?

pitching industry trend stories

The trend here is that I’m not listening.

If you’re like most PR reps, you struggle with getting trade pubs to understand what’s so intriguing about your clients and give them the proper coverage.

Many of you try to sell client’s success as an “industry trend” story. But how’s that working for ya? My guess: Not very well. Here’s why, from an editor’s perspective, and what you can do about it.

Take This Pitch. Please.

At least once a week, I get an email like this:

I’m reaching out because I thought you would be interested in a piece exploring the evolution of the cloud industry and how ACME CLOUD has become a major player in the space. The company already has over 350,000 customers and offers an industry-leading low-cost monthly price.

Their competitor, Big Cloud Juggernaut, has become known for its terrible customer service and this is where ACME SOLUTIONS has carved out a competitive niche. In addition, ACME SOLUTIONS serves all size customers, while Big Cloud Juggernaut and Universal Solutions focus on larger, enterprise-level companies. This has left hundreds of thousands of small and medium size customers for ACME CLOUD to serve.

Customer service isn’t the only differentiator for ACME SOLUTIONS. Check out this price comparison for ACME SOLUTIONS vs. the major players in the industry. It shows ACME SOLUTIONS can provide the same computing capabilities for as little as one-tenth the cost of major competitors.

I would love to get you on the phone with ACME SOLUTIONS CEO to discuss the state of the industry and how they are able to provide such a cost efficient option…

 One Vendor Does Not a Trend Make  

 The only “story” here is that Acme Cloud claims to have lower prices and better customer service than its competitors. and targets an underserved market If I were on-staff covering the cloud industry and had a responsibility to my readers to report on every new entrant to the industry, profiling this company might make sense.

But that’s what this story is, a single company profile, not an industry trend piece. Trying to sell it as a trend actually hurts your case because the body of the email doesn’t back up the opening premise. As an editor or reporter, that tells me you’re trying to put lipstick on a pig and makes me stop reading.

You only have an industry trend story to pitch if:

  • It involves a new business model, competitive edge or technology. One company claiming lower prices or better customer service than another is as old as the hills.
  • It involves multiple companies, of which your client is a lead example. One company claiming a lead over all others is, by definition, a story about your client, not a trend.
  • If you explain how this trend helps the reader.  You could argue that, if Acme Cloud is so great, learning about it helps readers. But that’s only true to the extent their claims are true, and until someone else catches up to them. Next month, Acme could stumble and a competitor take the lead in pricing or service. A better trend pitch would give customers tips on how to choose a cloud vendor that will have lasting advantage over others.

Deliver What You Promise

If there’s more industry insight and thought leadership here, the PR pro needs to identify it in the pitch, and their spokesperson has to deliver on it in the interview. And he has to be able to point to other players, besides themselves, who can vouch for this new trend.

Yes, that’s a tough challenge. But there’s precious little space in credible publications these days, and you have to earn your way into them.

What client pitches are, and aren’t working with influential trade pubs these days? How do you identify, develop and sell industry trend pitches that work? Send me your best examples and I’ll highlight them in a guest post.= 

Need help developing and executing thought leadership content? Drop me a line and we can brainstorm some ideas.

Author: Bob Scheier
Visit Bob's Website - Email Bob
I'm a veteran IT trade press reporter and editor with a passion for clear writing that explains how technology can help businesses. To learn more about my content marketing services, email bob@scheierassociates.com or call me at 508 725-7258.

Using an E-Book To Make a Complex Sell

Cover croppedE-books (short, illustration-rich explainers of complex concepts) can be good or they can be trite. Too much dense copy and they become as hard to read as the worst white paper. Too little copy, or a too-cute theme, and they turn off serious buyers.

Sonatype, in my opinion, hit the sweet spot with their promo pamphlet “Go fast. Be Secure.”  While I picked up a paper copy at the MIT Sloan CIO Summit last week, it’s crying out for re-purposing as an ebook.

It uses a medieval type face and “knights in shining armor” theme to explain how Sonatype’s  software automatically ensures that Java code from the global open source community (rather than from commercial software vendors) won’t pose a security threat to corporate developers.

Short and Sweet

They had me on the cover page with a concise value statement. “Go fast. Be Secure.” The subhead explains: “A true story of how Development and Security came together to fix the risk in open source.” Note the short, direct sentences. (One quibble: Using present tense would emphasize this is a service available now, not something that happened in the past.)

Keep reading and you see big, clear pictures and a maximum of about two dozen words per page, in large type for easy reading. The words are carefully chosen for maximum impact, without redundant background or jargon. “Development wanted to GO FAST. But Security wanted to slow down and BE SAFE.” I like that the wording is specific enough that CCF05252013_00002experts in software development “get it” but even an outsider (like a CFO or CEO) can get the general drift. And the illustrations reinforce, rather than confuse, the message.

About four pages in, the e-book introduces technical concepts and the pain point they solve. “Code became like Legos™ – applications easily assembled from thousands of freely available parts. Developers ran even FASTER and Security found it even harder to SECURE.”  Note there’s only one concept introduced per page, and not a word is wasted.

A few pages on they describe the answer: “Bringing SECURITY and SPEED together by building component intelligence and governance in from the START…using all the tools developers love to use today!” Again, the sentences are short, direct, and describe what’s new and better about their approach.

Halfway through the ebook they introduce their notion of “component lifecycle management.” This might turn a reader off as jargon if the vendor had led with it. Instead, they wait until they’ve described what type of components they’re talking about, what kind of lifecycle these components have and why those components need to be managed.

Ye Olde Mini Demo

The second half of the book is essentially a mini-demo of the service. There’s a standard format with a short, concise value proposition on the left (“AUTOMATE and enforce GOVERNANCE in the tools you use today”) and a screen shot CCF05252013_00001on the right. A one-sentence supplemental explainer sits under each screen shot.

One added benefit of the e-book format is that it makes these screen shots large enough to actually read — long a pet peeve of mine in conventional white papers and trade pubs.

Finally, at the end, there’s the call to action (a link to a free snapshot of the reader’s application vulnerabilities) and a “Learn more” page.

Looks Easy But It Ain’t

Creating an e-book this clear required, I would guess, a lot of gut-wrenching work behind the scenes. You need to:

  • Define very, very clearly the top two or three messages you need to convey.
  • Find a very, very clear and concise way to say them.
  • Choose your words carefully so you’re not speaking down to or confusing or reader.
  • Choose and execute a graphical theme that supports but doesn’t distract from your message.
Author: Bob Scheier
Visit Bob's Website - Email Bob
I'm a veteran IT trade press reporter and editor with a passion for clear writing that explains how technology can help businesses. To learn more about my content marketing services, email bob@scheierassociates.com or call me at 508 725-7258.
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