PR/Marketing Trends Archives

Nailing Quotes for Reporters

editorial calendarsCongratulations – a reporter has agreed to interview one of your clients for a story. The bad news: Your client suddenly got too busy for an interview, but will answer emailed questions.

You probably review your client’s answers before passing them on to the reporter. But based on my recent experience, some PR pros aren’t looking for the right things – or not looking closely enough.

Check this “to-do” list to maximize your client’s chances of being quoted.

Did they actually answer the question?

You’d be amazed (or maybe not) at how many answers aren’t really answers. They’re discussions, musings, self-evident problem statements or thinly disguised marketing claims. Real answers have a “yes,” “no” or clearly defined “It all depends” statement.

If I ask “Is cloud computing safe for medical records?” don’t tell me “The safety of patient information in the cloud is an issue any responsible enterprise will need to consider carefully.” Instead, give me examples of how to tell when it is or isn’t safe, or examples of safe/unsafe data.

Did you spell out all acronyms and explain all terms?

One recent response said “(IT) automation has the inherent risk of creating a `black box’.”  It never described what the client meant by “black box” or what the risk is. I have a pretty good idea what they meant, but in an email (unlike an interview) I can’t easily clarify it. If I need to start another email thread to ask, under deadline, it cuts your chances of being quoted.

The same goes for acronyms, as in: “CNCF and other communities provide reference architectures…” If you told me this was “the Cloud Native Computing Foundation” an open source standards effort” I’d be much more likely to include it.

Did you attribute the response to a specific person with a title, not an amorphous organization?

Editors insist their reporter’s quote people, especially for in-depth, advice-oriented features.

Did you spell check the reply?

I know auto correct makes stupid mistakes, and that your client is in a rush. But sloppy grammar errors make me doubt the rest of the response as well.

Did you provide a three to six word description of your client so the writer can position them in the story?

Make sure these are short and specify whether your client sells hardware, software or services. Think “cloud security services provider” or “Salesforce configuration services provider.” Avoid vague, marketing-driven statements like “Acme Solutions helps enterprises worldwide maximize the value of their sales teams.”

Did you avoid stories, quotes, or examples from third parties?

“A 2016 Gartner report (quoted in InfoWorld) showed demand for data scientists will rise 20.7 per cent per year between 2016 and 2020.” This forces me to check if your client got the number right and if I or they have the right to reuse that figure. I also can’t quote a report in a competing publication. Better approach: Provide a link to only publicly accessible reports so I can cite them accurately, easily and with confidence.

Did you edit for clarity and conciseness?

Not everything has to be a super sound bite, but help your client by crisping up their writing. Here’s one example from Eric Turnquist, senior director of information technology at network monitoring and it management vendor Ipswitch, (not a client of mine.) My question was whether system administrators are still needed in a world of DevOps (combining development and operations to speed applications to market.)

“Traditional systems administrator skills will still be needed. There’s usually tribal knowledge around legacy systems – people that know the old systems because they were here when they were built – that is tough to replace. Everything hasn’t been completely migrated from those old systems…now you’re stuck with it and need folks with traditional skills to use that technology, or to finish migrating from it. Knowledge of traditional systems and the skills to use them will always be in demand for this reason.”

Do you review your clients’ responses to emailed reporters’ questions? If you push back for better answers, do they listen?

Author: Bob Scheier
Visit Bob's Website - Email Bob
I'm a veteran IT trade press reporter and editor with a passion for clear writing that explains how technology can help businesses. To learn more about my content marketing services, email bob@scheierassociates.com or call me at 508 725-7258.

No Messaging, No Payoff In Marketing Automation?

how boost ROI marketing automation When I work with clients on white papers, Web sites and other collateral, the hardest part is often getting them to explain what the heck they want to say.

Veteran marketer Tom Grubb has found the same thing while implementing marketing automation at companies such as CA Technologies. In this guest post Grubb, chief strategy officer at digital marketing agency Digital-Pi, explains how a lack of proper positioning can hobble entire marketing automation efforts.

What do you hear from the Monday morning quarterbacks after your marketing program results are in and they failed to deliver great results?

“Your subject line sucked.”

“The landing pages were confusing.”

“I told you not to put that graphic there.”

That white paper?  Really?”

Yeah, you could have tested your subject line, landing page, graphics and the offer.  But there may be something much bigger lurking beneath your lackluster program performance than a tweak here or a swap there that you overlooked:  your company/product messaging – or lack thereof.   If you don’t get your messaging right and tight, the revenue you take will rarely equal the marketing investment you make.

This ah-ha moment struck me during a two-day engagement in San Antonio with an established SaaS business going to market as a newly independent company.  Ken Rutsky, an expert on messaging and positioning asked me to collaborate with him to advise on technology, demand gen, and go-to-market.  We had a game plan for the two days centered on funnels, forecasting models, user experience and a marketing technology stack. After we defined the structure and segmentation for their market, my partner Ken the messaging master drove a mini brainstorming session that resulted in a rough messaging and positioning architecture for their business.  That evening, Ken worked his magic on the day’s rough messaging turning ideas into words and structure in a way that was clear, concise, logical, and effective.

When we reviewed his work with the team the next morning, it was clear to me that this was the cornerstone to the success for the rest of our work – and the marketing programs that would soon follow.  The big idea is this: marketing automation and program execution divorced from great messaging and positioning can significantly reduce ROI on marketing investments.  ­By the same measure, great messaging and positioning can enable – and therefore greatly improve your returns on marketing investments.

When I was at Intuit, getting messaging and positioning right and tight was table stakes for every Intuit business unit.  I learned Intuit’s “message mapping process,” but more important I learned the power of using a messaging methodology to get everyone in every role at the business on the same page.  All were able to clearly articulate what was unique, compelling and great about our products.  It made marketing so much faster and easier because we always stuck to the blueprint, no matter what tactic or program we brought to bear.

If messaging and positioning are so important – so fundamental to great marketing – why then don’t more companies build and maintain a great messaging foundation?  Here are a few reasons that come to mind:

  • Company somehow believes they have it – but they don’t
  • Messaging is not aligned to where the company is today
  • Messaging is not aligned to where the market/competition is today
  • Various factions in the company make up their own versions of messaging
  • Messaging was built by someone who doesn’t really understand how to build great messaging
  • Stakeholders were left out of the message building process and don’t understand or have any interest in following it
  • The messaging is not documented in a usable way

And what happens?  Everyone at your company can interpret your company’s value to mean something different on any given day, for any marketing initiative.  All marketing disciplines are diminished: public relations, demand-gen, investor relations—all of it.

So what can you do?  For starters, give serious thought to getting someone outside of your company to help you get your messaging defined; if you have messaging in place, ask yourself if it could use a refresh, a re-think, or another set of eyes outside your business to give it a look.  Our visit to San Antonio was the catalyst that made creating a great messaging architecture possible for our client.  We looked at their business from the outside, bringing new ideas and reinforced some of their thinking around how they could segment their market, surface their value and differentiation, and go-to-market in a strong, cohesive way.

The message is clear: get your messaging and positioning defined and documented and put it to work in your marketing.  With your messaging right and tight, you are more likely to find that the revenue you take will be more than the marketing investments you make.

Author: Bob Scheier
Visit Bob's Website - Email Bob
I'm a veteran IT trade press reporter and editor with a passion for clear writing that explains how technology can help businesses. To learn more about my content marketing services, email bob@scheierassociates.com or call me at 508 725-7258.

Digital Lessons From a Dying Industry

Hand in sea water asking for help. Failure and rescue concept.Yes, some people still read the print version of newspapers. So when the Boston Globe botched the move to a new delivery provider and left us paperless for the better part of a week, it caused a major disturbance in the force for my significant other.

Mistakes do happen, of course, although after 143 years you have to wonder what the Globe doesn’t know about home delivery. But it was its botched response to the delivery problems that holds lessons for anyone trying to succeed in this “digital” age (however you define it.)

Here are four digital must-haves I see my clients talking about, how the Globe failed to achieve each and some lessons for the rest of us.

  • Anticipate, don’t just meet, customer expectations: Proactively apologize for failures, tell the customer what compensation (if any) they’ll receive, but most importantly tell them when their problem will be resolved. It took four days for the Globe to even tell us we’d get a credit for the undelivered papers, and no word on a solution except that delivery problems should ease “within the next few weeks.”
  • Provide a seamless, personalized experience across service channels such as phone, Web and mobile apps. Nothing screams “clueless” like endless waits on customer service lines and Web sites that crash under the flood of complaints. When Netflix can instantly stream video to my phone, why couldn’t the Globe buy a bunch of cloud capacity to keep its customer service site up? The Globe showed it’s neither effective in its old business model (delivering physical papers) nor its new online, digital model.
  • Provide a personalized customer experience that puts the customer’s needs, not what you want to sell them, at the center. The service rep I finally got on the phone not only couldn’t tell me when delivery to my street would resume, she didn’t seem to hear my question.  How about a Web site showing, in green, yellow and red, what areas will see their papers the fastest? Or even better, email or text alerts with updates on when service will resume to a subscriber’s street?
  • Recognize the customer is in charge and act accordingly. With its late and clueless communication, the Globe seems to have forgotten its customers even exist, much less understanding and meeting their needs. Fixing this doesn’t require sophisticated Big Data social media analytics, but just common sense and putting yourself in the customer’s shoes. For example, if you were a subscriber to a daily newspaper would you be satisfied hearing  that delivery will resume sometime in the next few weeks?

I say all this more from sadness than anger, having admired the Globe for most of my life. It takes strong, healthy news outlets to do investigative reporting like the Globe’s uncovering of sexual abuse in the Catholic Church as portrayed in the movie Spotlight.) Having already been crippled by the Web, the last thing the Globe needs is to finish the job off through its own incompetence.

For the rest of us, it’s a shot across the bow and a heads-up to put the systems and processes in place to respond like a true digital organization when – not if – we have big and unexpected customer service issues.

Author: Bob Scheier
Visit Bob's Website - Email Bob
I'm a veteran IT trade press reporter and editor with a passion for clear writing that explains how technology can help businesses. To learn more about my content marketing services, email bob@scheierassociates.com or call me at 508 725-7258.

Selling the Five Waves of “Transformation”

How to sell transformation IBM, Dell, Capgemini and Accenture all claim they can deliver it.  McKinsey & Co. claims the entire nation of China is doing it.

“It” is  digital transformation. Personally, I don’t get it, because:

  • If “digital” means “computerized,” we’ve all been “digitally transformed” a bunch of times since the 1960s. (Think mainframe, minicomputer, client-server, Web, and now mobile, social, cloud and Big Data.)
  • And as for transformation, as I’ve argued  repeatedly, this is meaningless jargon unless you say what you’re transforming yourself from and to. Much of the time, “transformation” is just a fancy word for saying “better” or “cheaper.”

Go With the Flow, Bob

Rather than fight the tide, maybe I should accept that “digital transformation” is popular because it speaks to what my clients are trying to tell their prospects. Let’s try riding the wave instead, based on several of the definitions floating around out there:
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Note that, while there are common themes across definitions, how much room there is for differentiation based on each specific definition, and the specific strengths you bring to the market.

Breakthrough! Transformation Defined

By making its definition very specific (“The realignment of, or new investment in, technology and business models to more effectively engage digital customers at every touchpoint in the customer experience lifecycle” the Altimeter Group was able to craft a customer survey that uncovered specific, rather than vague, implementation issues.

The “process,” rather than technical issues, uncovered (below) seem to make digital transformation an easier pitch for consultants than hardware or software-centric players, unless they can describe specifically how their skills in areas such as Big Data or business intelligence help organizations better understand today’s mobile and socially-connected customers.

Even One Word Can Help

All this is well and good if you and your prospect agree on a definition for digital transformation.  If you don’t bother defining it, or define it only vaguely, you’re inviting your customers to misunderstand what you’re offering.

nJust changing one word – “digital transformation” to “IT transformation” – means you’re talking about, as Accenture puts it, the need to “…identify which IT capabilities are most critical to the success of the overall enterprise, and shape an IT organization and capability that supports the business cost-effectively.”

That’s what most of my clients mean by “transformation” and it usually boils down to reducing costs through things like virtualization, data center consolidation, and training lower-level or lower-cost offshore staff to handle more complex support requests. That’s all well and good, but it doesn’t deliver the unified customer experience and universal market insights “digital” transformation implies.

Does any of this clear up all this transformation talk or just make it confusing in a new way?

Author: Bob Scheier
Visit Bob's Website - Email Bob
I'm a veteran IT trade press reporter and editor with a passion for clear writing that explains how technology can help businesses. To learn more about my content marketing services, email bob@scheierassociates.com or call me at 508 725-7258.

using third party data for progressive profiling of B2B prospects

Ask too few questions on a qualification form that “gates” your content and you can’t identify and track the best prospects. But probe too deeply about their employer, business function, budget or purchase schedule and they’ll abandon your site for a competitor’s.

The answer, of course, is progressive profiling. Don’t ask for their whole identity enchilada at once. Instead, ask for more and more detailed information about them over time in return for more detailed, in-depth or proprietary insights.

Progressive profiling isn’t new. But at the MarketingSherpa Email Summit 2014 in Las Vegas Byron O’Dell, Senior Director of Demand Management at IHS, described how the B2B information vendor used a unique approach to boost its click through rate by 1,112%.

Slow and Steady

As IHS developed not only primary but secondary personas for their most valuable prospects, they faced the challenge of identifying which persona best fit each prospect. IHS didn’t ask prospects for any personal information until the third week of a drip marketing campaign, said O’Dell. And by reducing the number of questions prospects had to answer from 15 to seven, it got “much higher completion rates.”

To get the most bang from each answer, one question contained a drop down list explicitly asking which persona the prospect fit into. To make answering even easier, IHS used a combination of the prospect’s IP address and a third-party marketing database to make an educated guess about details such as their company name and location.

 

progressive profiling B2B content marketing

IHS used drop-down lists to make it easier for prospects to answer “gating” questions.

Once the reader provided their company name and role, IHS added about 20 fields of additional information to its internal customer database, including phone number, annual sales of the prospect’s company, number of employees, etc. All that not only gave their salespeople much more background about the prospect, but let IHS customize follow-up messaging based on the prospect’s persona. (To hold down costs, this customization is done automatically, and doesn’t involve major changes to the content.)

progressive profiling B2B content marketing

Simple automatic changes customize content for various personas.

What’s In It for the Prospect?

In return for more valuable content – essentially free samples of their research – IHS dove further into asking prospects about secondary personas. About 50 percent of the time, O’Dell says, they provided that information.

Note that this is a far cry from buying a third party database to do a “batch and blast” single email to everyone on a list, whether qualified or not. It instead uses information the prospect has provided (even just implicitly in the form of their IP address) and uses it to make it easier for the prospect to fill out the form to get the information they need.

O’Dell said he hasn’t seen any push-back from prospects over the “creep” factor of a Web site knowing where they’re coming from. Maybe that’s because HIS is using that knowledge not to push a sales pitch, but to provide content tailored to their needs.

Which is what persona-driven content marketing should be all about. Download the slides or watch the presentation here.

You can also check out my simple “progressive profile” content sequence for selling cloud services.  If you have a product or service you’d like to see a sample sequence for, drop me a line or call at 508 725-7258.

Author: Bob Scheier
Visit Bob's Website - Email Bob
I'm a veteran IT trade press reporter and editor with a passion for clear writing that explains how technology can help businesses. To learn more about my content marketing services, email bob@scheierassociates.com or call me at 508 725-7258.

Why Won’t Vendors Come Out and Fight?

bigstock-Cartoon-kid-suffering-from-bul-33837272What do your clients do when they’re accused of doing wrong? A) Present a detailed, convincing defense? B) Pretend they didn’t hear the question? C) Talk around the issue with marketing jargon?

The answers, according to my recent experience in a story on software pricing, are B) and C).  A number of  consultants who negotiate software contracts told me that major software vendors are sneaking price hikes by customers with ever more complex contracts, terms and conditions.

None of the four household-name software vendors to whom I sent detailed, specific questions about their pricing policies gave a convincing response.

Two never replied. A third declined comment. The fourth answered with bland marketing-speak and a link to a company blog post announcing a new, supposedly simplified licensing program. But the blog post, like the emailed responses, was mostly marketing jargon.

Even worse, the only comment on the post was a customer complaining that the vendors licensing agreements were hard to understand. In other words, the blog post the PR person referred me to hurt their client’s case.

If you’re actually trying to bamboozle major customers and can’t admit it, fair enough and  good luck. But I suspect there are other, more convincing answers vendors could give. For example:

  • “Yes, our licenses are becoming more complex, but that’s because our customers’ environments are becoming more complex. We’re trying to reach a balance between a fair return on our development and support costs and not gouging our customers. Let us explain the clauses you asked about…”
  •  “We recently changed our virtualization licenses because, with our software running on more physical platforms than we ever expected, our support costs were going through the roof. Virtualization is also putting more demands on our development staff to support features like dynamic migration. We need a price hike to meet these costs and maintain our margins.”
  •  “Yes, we are claiming the right to charge users of third-party apps who access our ERP application. And, yes, when we ask for those charges seems a little arbitrary right now. But we’re working with customers to figure out when it’s appropriate. Here are the questions we’re grappling with…”

Now, let’s look at the downside of refusing to respond or giving canned answers:

  • The reader hears only the charges against you, not your explanation.
  • You lose the opportunity to explain your position and make sure the reporter understands it.
  • You lead the reporter, and reader, to assume you have something to hide.
  • You leave more space in the story to talk about the accusations, not your responses.

I can hear you nodding now and saying “I agree, but I can’t get my boss/clients to listen!” If this is true, what would it take to convince your boss or client to fight back when things get ugly?”

Author: Bob Scheier
Visit Bob's Website - Email Bob
I'm a veteran IT trade press reporter and editor with a passion for clear writing that explains how technology can help businesses. To learn more about my content marketing services, email bob@scheierassociates.com or call me at 508 725-7258.

A Spicy Role in $500 Billion of IT Sales

SMB IT marketing

Not your father’s trade show.

More than a thousand “SpiceHeads” and vendors descended on Austin this week, complete with bandanas, unicorn disguises, green capes, alien outfits, tattoos and kilts.

It wasn’t Halloween and it wasn’t part of a “Keep Austin Weird” campaign.  It was SpiceWorld, the sixth and largest gathering of users of SpiceWorks’ free ad-supported network management and IT help desk software. The kitsch was not the usual “at the edges” trade show goofiness, but an essential part of SpiceWorks’ competitive edge.

Giving the mostly male, geeky IT support world a sense of community and fun generates tremendous engagement with the SpiceWorks site. Four and a half million IT pros visit the SpiceWorks site each month, spending 5.5 billion minutes in SpiceWorks (easily outpacing time on other tech sites just as TechTarget and CNET,) claimed co-founder and CEO Scott Abel. Most importantly, the ads and advice on SpiceWorks influenced more than $500 billion in IT purchases in the last year, he said.

Based on their browsing habits SpiceWorks serves up customized ads, along with the ability to solicit bids from advertisers such as CDW. One attendee called it “Facebook for Techies.”

(Customers download SpiceWorks’ ever-expanding stable of free software to run on their own servers, to ease concerns about SpiceWorks knowing too much about their internal systems. SpiceWorks collects data which it can use for services such as recruiting virtual focus groups for vendors.)

Community Uber Alles

It’s a model vendors and IT trade pubs have been trying to make work since the pre-Internet days of bulletin boards. But none of them thought to sweeten the pot with free software that solves real problems for the grunts in the trenches. None also gave so much control and recognition to folks who rarely get attention, much less respect, from tech giants.

SpiceWorks didn’t plan on such a central role for the community. It jumped on the bandwagon when it was how much heartfelt advice users were sharing. It ranges from problems with switches to bad bosses to charity drives for injured pets. SpiceHeads rate each other’s contributions, as well as those from the “Green Guy” vendor reps who answer questions and respond to complaints.

The 225-employee company accepts — even depends on — real-time, unvarnished feedback from its users. So do vendors such as Pertino, which relied on SpiceHead suggestions in designing its Cloud VPN (virtual private network). SpiceHeads will even trash an ill-conceived vendor advertisement on the site, and a smart vendor will openly admit it’s wrong, thank the community for its guidance and even encourage SpiceHeads to spoof the ad.

Stick It to the Man

Knowing its customers usually toil in obscurity and rarely get noticed when things go right, SpiceWorks goes out of its way to celebrate them as heroes. Super-hero or fantasy themes abound, as in the orange dinosaur mascot “SpiceRex” or the – what else? – alien at the AlienVault unified security management booth.

SpiceWorks doesn’t compete with its advertisers, says Technical Program Manager David Bsbbitt, because it deliberately limits its own offerings to the 20% of capabilities that solve 80% of most customers’ needs. Enough SpiceWorks’ users, especially as their organizations grow, will always need more sophisticated or scalable products, leaving plenty of room for all.  “You guys using tools developed by other software vendors is how we make money,” Abel told the audience.

SpiceWorks just announced APIs to encourage other vendors to integrate their offerings with SpiceWorks. One recent example is Fibrelinks’s MaaS360 mobile device management software. Like other vendors, FibreLink offers basic functionality for free, with other features such as the ability to wipe devices or reset passcodes, available at a discount for SpiceHeads.

The “we’re all in this together” sense of community is palpable. One attendee described her husband’s nervousness about her getting rides to the convention center from fellow SpiceHeads she’s never met.  “If I’d trust them (for advice about) my network, why wouldn’t I trust them for a ride?” she replied.

Show Me the Money

The privately-held company is not yet making spicy profits, said Abel, but it “is not wildly negative” and is focusing on new features such as “user profiles” that help SpiceHeads showcase their skills and projects. The goal is not so much to move into the recruitment business a la LinkedIn, he says, but to keep more SpiceHeads on the site longer. Spiceworks is also beefing up its content creation services for vendors, especially in the fast-growing video segment.

If you’re looking to market to CIOs or CEOs, SpiceWorld is not yet the place. Khakis and a button-down shirt was over-dressed; jeans, or even shorts, and a “Back the F: /** Up” T-shirt (“F” as in “F” drive — get it?) were more typical. SpiceWorks has to keep managing its users’ expectations for new features they’d like to see but aren’t on SpiceWorks’ radar. And as they grow, it will be a challenge to keep their “SpiceHeads first” culture intact.

But if you want to reach passionate brand recommenders in the trenches – and are willing to take some tough feedback from them when you don’t deliver – SpiceWorks is unlike any other marketing channel I’ve seen.

Author: Bob Scheier
Visit Bob's Website - Email Bob
I'm a veteran IT trade press reporter and editor with a passion for clear writing that explains how technology can help businesses. To learn more about my content marketing services, email bob@scheierassociates.com or call me at 508 725-7258.

SMB Buyers Reveal Hidden Desires

Marketing tips SMB IT managersEarlier this year, help desk software vendor and online community Spiceworks threw four Boston-area IT managers from small and medium businesses to the wolves – or, more specifically, to an audience of about 50 marketing and sales people.

The audience was actually well-fed with appetizers (and watered with drinks) but they were fairly itching to ask these real-life would-be customers what works and what didn’t in selling them IT products and services.

These four guys all came from different industries, ranging from legal to financial services and academic, and of course had somewhat individual preferences. But they were all down to earth, intensely pragmatic and surprisingly savvy about the tips and tricks we use to identify when they’re ready to buy.

They’re wicked busy. (I can use the word “wicked” since we were in Boston.) Their days are relentlessly busy and unpredictable. They don’t have a lot of time to waste on anything, and interruptions and nagging from vendors are huge turnoffs. One said any salesperson should assume they are always – always – doing something else on their computer while they’re on the phone.

Some tips these SMB buyers offered the marketers in the audience:

  • Just because they bailed in the middle of a Webinar doesn’t mean they’re not interested. They were probably called away on an emergency. Provide a link so they can see it as their leisure.
  • If they make time to talk to a salesperson they want it to be scheduled. Don’t just call and expect them to sit still for chit-chat.
  • Make all marketing content short and sweet. Keep white papers under four pages. Consider adding a spec sheet to a white paper so the customer has all the info in one place. (Most of my clients would hate to be so “salesley” but customers favor convenience over such stylistic fine points. If the white paper itself is informative and not hype, why not make it easy for the prospect to see a product data sheet as well?)
  • They don’t have time to be led down the garden path with something they can’t afford. Disclose the price early.
  • Their formal titles or roles are far less important than their pain. “I don’t care about whether I fit your profile” of a customer, one said. “I care about whether you can solve my problem.” Optimize your content for searches around problems, not around target titles.
  • Free trials rock. They’re a great, low-risk way to see if your software does what it says, when it’s convenient for the customer. 

None of these tips has anything to do with highfalutin’ theories about content funnels or prospect personas.  But they are intensely practical and a reflection of how busy SMB customers are, and the need to keep it short, clear and to the point when pitching them.

Have you –or would you – be so bold as to add a lowly product data sheet to your lofty thought leadership white papers? If so, how did it work?

Author: Bob Scheier
Visit Bob's Website - Email Bob
I'm a veteran IT trade press reporter and editor with a passion for clear writing that explains how technology can help businesses. To learn more about my content marketing services, email bob@scheierassociates.com or call me at 508 725-7258.
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