Content Marketing For IT Vendors Archives

Avoid These Four Pitching Sins

tips for pitching editors Forbes recently reported that 68% of reporters are unhappy with the pitches they get from corporate communications and PR types.

Here are four pitching sins I see almost every day, with my suggested improvement in italics.

Sin #1: Vagueness

“Hi, Bob –

I wanted to touch base to see if you would be interested in a company update briefing with *****, the leading provider of next generation ****** solutions. ***** We have an upcoming announcement and would love to brief you…”

Instead tell me what you’re announcing, how it’s new and different and why it’s important to the customer. For example, “Next week, we are announcing a service that slashes and cost and complexity of securing mobile devices through a new, lightweight encryption protocol. We’re also announcing a distribution deal with AT&T to spur adoption…” 

Sin #2: Tech for Tech’s Sake

 “**** has announced the availability of its much anticipated new rugged handheld…with better overall performance with an astonishingly bright display, an extra-long battery life, enhanced GPS capabilities, and rugged IP68 construction.”

Better, cheaper, better…yadda yadda yadda. This sounds more like a bill of materials than an exciting story about what readers can do with the new device. How about “For years, roughnecks in North Dakota’s oil country have struggled to place rush orders for critical drilling equipment due to dim screens, inaccurate GPS readings and failing batteries on their handhelds. Soon, their orders will arrive more quickly and drilling will go easier due to the ease of use, brighter screen, extended battery life and enhanced GPS capabilities of our new…”

Sin #3: Good for us, we’re at a trade show.

“Joe Doakes, CEO of Transformative Solutions, has been selected to speak at The Global Transformation Forum on “The Role of Software-Defined Networks in Enabling Next Generation Solutions in the Internet of Things.” Transformative Solutions will also be displaying at booth #422 in the Hotel Mediocre…”

And I care…why? Wait until you’ve drafted his speech (and he approved it) so your pitch can summarize what he will say and why it matters to customers or the industry. Even better: How about a link that will send me his presentation after the speech, making it easier for me to write about it? Or even a link to a video of his speech so I can help it go viral if I find it compelling? 

Sin #4: Bearing false witness.

One virtualization vendor sent an email promising “Five tips for evaluating software-defined storage.” They included:

  1. Does Software-Defined Storage work?

“Yes. Convergence of compute and storage and software-defined storage has been field-proven in leading companies…”

  1. Does Software-Defined Storage make sense for me?

“…there are few IT environments where these benefits are not desirable.”

  1. Am I capable of implementing Software-Defined Storage?

“Software-defined storage is simple to implement and configure…in most cases, a single administrator can manage both compute and storage resources.”

  1. Can I use my existing storage and servers to deploy Software-Defined Storage?

“Yes. Software-defined storage solutions should seamlessly co-exist with the existing infrastructure…”

Sounds like a not-very thinly disguised product pitch, doesn’t it? If your subject line promises “honest” advice you have to provide it to get the interest you want. Answer real questions such as “Is software-defined storage a good idea for a company that lacks a dedicated storage admin?” “Is everyone really capable of implementing it equally well?” Are the standards mature enough to avoid vendor lock-in?”

 And if you’re really serious about reforming your pitches, check out these five phrases that drive most editors to the “delete” key.

Author: Bob Scheier
Visit Bob's Website - Email Bob
I'm a veteran IT trade press reporter and editor with a passion for clear writing that explains how technology can help businesses. To learn more about my content marketing services, email bob@scheierassociates.com or call me at 508 725-7258.

Can Better Training Boost Software Sales?

enterprise software sales

A recent piece in Business Week claims that the bad old days of salesmen bamboozling big customers into overpriced, overcustomized enterprise software are gone. The rise of easy-to-try cloud software and savvier customers means the profile for the ideal sales rep has shifted, has one source says, from “aggressive and persistent to technical and smart.”

Such changes will eliminate “hundreds of thousands of cushy field sales jobs,” the story predicts.  Those who survive will have to be far more technically savvy, knowledgeable about the stuff they sell and able to prove that it works.

Business Week claims enterprise software salespeople are spending less time on golf and trade shows, “more nights at home scouring LinkedIn or writing detailed consultant-style reports on how a product can cut costs or boost revenue.” (My italics.)

Sounds like content marketing, doesn’t it? It got me thinking about how we can leverage the collateral we’re already developing to engage customers to help salespeople sell.

Proving Business Value

A lot of the sales training I’ve seen starts with gauzy high-level benefits (“Digital Transformation for the Age of the Customer”). Then come dense descriptions of vaguely named “solutions”  (“Webify Customer Delight 2.0”). The real detail comes in descriptions of the money-making goodies: Complex pricing tiers, bundling options and license terms (“Use of the Framjus 2.0 framework across four or more CPUs requires enterprise licensing of the Nooknik 6.3 database or higher.”)

No wonder, as one corporate customer told Business Week, too many salesmen “were savvier about the terms of their contract than in helping us get value from the software.” To reach today’s (and tomorrow’s) customers why not train salespeople first in specific, provable business benefits, and then give them simpler, easier to sell products and clearer licensing terms.

Technical Chops

In the old days, says one software sales manager, “You could set up a lunch (with a client) and say `Meet my software engineer and enjoy the demo.’” Such salespeople, he said, are being “washed out of the business” in favor of those who can both charm customers and discuss their software in depth.

Assuming you can’t turn your top coders into extroverted sales people, that means making your sales people more tech savvy. Doing so requires understanding what deep-dive technical questions customers are most likely to ask, then translating the complex answers into terms a salesperson can understand and explain clearly. Again, a lot of this ground should be covered in the “explainer” or “technical architecture” white papers you’re already doing. Your more business-oriented white papers, on the other hand, can help your tech experts understand the bottom-line challenges facing customers and how you can help.

“Land and Expand”

This can otherwise we defined as “toot your own horn.” A salesperson “lands” a relatively small contract with one department of a large customer, then makes  sure that customer’s peers, or other departments within the company hear about how well it worked. This sharing requires close cooperation between your field sales staff and content marketing group, so the writers learn about these small wins and turn them into case studies. It might also mean integrating your content management system with your customer relationship management platform so the right wins are automatically shared with the right prospects. It also requires case studies that get properly specific about the benefits.

Were software sales ever as bad Business Week claims? Is it changing as much as they predict? And can content marketing help make with the shift?

Author: Bob Scheier
Visit Bob's Website - Email Bob
I'm a veteran IT trade press reporter and editor with a passion for clear writing that explains how technology can help businesses. To learn more about my content marketing services, email bob@scheierassociates.com or call me at 508 725-7258.

By Gretchen Dukowitz

Case studies – love ’em or hate ’em – remain a critical part of the content marketing mix for almost every B2B organization. To some, they may seem stodgy (or dare I say boring?), but CMI research shows more companies are using them – 77% in 2015 – and 58% say they’re effective.

But, let’s be honest. Case-study creators’ opinions probably fall more on the hate-’em end of the spectrum. The tried-and-true formula – challenge, solution, benefit – doesn’t exactly inspire creativity or good storytelling, and the fallback – to pack them full of bad business jargon – can make writing a case study a huge chore.

Life is short; you shouldn’t waste it laboring over case studies. Fortunately, a few simple steps will allow you to not only create your case studies faster, easier, and less painfully, but can help make them sound better, too.

  1. Interview a real, live person

A good customer interview is the lifeblood of a good case study. Before you write a case study, do yourself a huge favor and actually talk to a real, live customer. In the past, I’ve been asked to write case studies based on quotes taken from videos, testimonial quotes, emails from sales teams – anything and everything but a customer interview.

“But wait,” I can hear you saying, “it’s hard to find customers and get time on their calendars. And get sign-off on the final product? Forget it.” Yes, it can be difficult and time-consuming, but trust me when I say that trying to use secondhand sources makes case study writing 100 times harder than it needs to be.

Case studies are stories. They have narratives and need to be rooted firmly in the experience of the customer. You can get all of these things by talking to one. The end result is a strong case study with a clear beginning, middle, and end, as opposed to a Frankenstein-assembled story that you put together from random parts.

  1. Edit the heck out of your quotes

You are a case-study writer, not a reporter. You are not being held to some journalistic standard that says you must reproduce all customer utterances word for word (not even journalists adhere to this standard, by the way). You can – make that should – edit and embellish quotes to make their point more effectively. In all my years of writing case studies, I have never had an interviewee take me to task for altering a quote. In fact, most people appreciate being made to sound better.

You can’t go crazy and just make up stuff for the fun of it. You have to retain the spirit of what a customer says and make it sound plausible. If you take a quote like, “Yes, on the whole, I would say the WidgetTron 2000 is a pretty good product,” and turn it into “The WidgetTron 2000 is the best product in the whole wide world and its awesomeness brings me to tears every time I think about it,” you’re going to run into problems.

A better way to shape the original quote would be something like this: “The WidgetTron 2000 is a really good product. It is easy to use and allowed us to streamline our operations.” I deleted the “on the whole” and changed “pretty good” to “really good,” which removes the lukewarm tone. I also extended the quote to make it sound well-rounded. A few small, completely OK tweaks make a big difference, and with customer approval, you are secure in knowing your updated quote works for everyone.

  1. Blow things out of proportion

When you get right down to it, most businesses aren’t too terribly concerned about the challenges other businesses face. This may be short-sighted, but more often than not, businesses are too knee-deep in their own issues to worry about the other guy (aside from giving lip service to outpacing the competition, of course).

This thinking is a big problem for case-study writers because exploring the case study’s problems – the challenge section – usually makes up at least a third of the story. To effectively hook readers, take a step back and think about why a broader audience might be interested in the one business’ challenge.

Let me show you. In this case study, the challenge is written as: “Luigi Mozzarello, CEO of Pronto Pies, needed to sell more pizzas, but his point-of-sale technology was slow and buggy.” Clearly, Mozzarello has a problem, but as written, the challenge isn’t compelling.

Here is a more broadly detailed challenge that has greater appeal: “Operating a restaurant is fraught with challenges, from demanding customers to razor-thin margins. Luigi Mozzarello, CEO of Pronto Pies, thought he could rely on his point-of-sale technology to give him a competitive edge, but it was slow and buggy.”

The revised challenge situates Mozzarello’s specific problem – bad technology – in the context of the larger restaurant industry and a universal business theme of competitive differentiation. The first sentence of your case study should always speak to a broad business issue and provide context for the reader. This provides a better chance that readers will identify with the broader challenge even if they are not in the study’s specific vertical or business.

I think crafting a first sentence like this also makes case studies easier to write. After all, if you have bigger, meatier issues to explore, you are less likely to simply go through the motions to craft the case study.

Conclusion

When you implement these three tips into your case-study process, you will be able to create an authentic, easy-to-understand voice that sets the stage for a meatier and more effective case study that is appealing to a wider audience.

Gretchen Dukowitz has spent more than a decade writing case studies, white papers, and other marketing content for some of the world’s largest technology companies, including Symantec and Cisco. She currently works as a writer and content strategist for a tech startup in the Bay Area. You can find more writing tips like these at her blog, DIY Content Marketing, or connect with her on LinkedIn. This post originally appeared on the Content Marketing institute Web site.  

Author: Bob Scheier
Visit Bob's Website - Email Bob
I'm a veteran IT trade press reporter and editor with a passion for clear writing that explains how technology can help businesses. To learn more about my content marketing services, email bob@scheierassociates.com or call me at 508 725-7258.

Four Tips for Selling Platforms

marketing a platform company

Needed: Deep wells of users and partners to drive the “network effect.”

If you hang around the geekier edges of the tech marketing world, you’ve heard a lot in the past few years about APIs, or application programming interfaces. APIs are what developers use to develop applications or services for an operating system like Windows (in the old days) or for a cloud service like Amazon (in these cloud-enabled days.)

Some have gone so far to claim we are in an “API economy” and that if you don’t have an API to encourage developers to link to your applications, data or other services you’re not competitive. Think that’s an overstatement? Consider a company as down to earth as the discount drug chain Walgreens. It offers  APIs that allow mobile apps to transmit photos for printing at its stores, for mobile app users to share health and wellness information in exchange for shopping rewards or to schedule appointments at its Healthcare Clinics.

Beyond APIs. Platforms

At last week’s  MIT Sloan CIO Symposium in Cambridge, MIT Professor Marshall Van Alstyne

claimed that companies that use tools such as APIs to become a  “platform” achieve massively greater market share, revenue and profits than those that sell only products.

He defines a platform as an “open architecture combined with a governance model that provides a useful function or service, and provides access to third parties.” Apple is a “platform” company in that it provides a set of operating systems and online services (such the App Store) on which others can build profitable goods and services, or sell products (though iTunes.) The “governance architecture” includes Apple’s famously strict rules for the look, feel and behavior of the applications it allows into its app store or that run on its iOS operating system.

Apple also happens to have a highly profitable hardware business. A purer platform example might be Google, whose “platforms” include its search engine and map service, which third parties can tap through APIs for everything from Web priced comparison to mobile shopping to the Uber  ride-sharing service.

Products have features, says Van Alstyne, while platforms have communities, “and the better platform and ecosystem wins every time” because it builds the largest “network effect” in which each new user increases the value of the service for all others. Building an ecosystem of outside developers, business partners and users demands a  focus on those outside of the enterprise, he says, if only because there are so many more potential partners and customers outside than inside.

Marketing Your Platform

So how can you, as a marketer, pivot from selling stuff to promoting a platform?

  1. Reach beyond a target set of potential “qualified” customers to a much wider audience of users who get more benefit the more information they share with others. A security “platform” company might serve as a clearinghouse for information about the latest threats and best practices for hardening systems against them. In software development, online repositories such as GitHub gain market share and revenue with each new developer who uses their tools for collaboration, code review and other functions.
  2. Even if you’re selling a technical product, make your value proposition as easy to understand as Google (instant easy search) or Uber (easy and inexpensive rides). The more you find yourself using product-centric jargon like “abstracting network services” or “transforming business intelligence” the more you sound like a widget company than a platform.
  3. Cultivate developers with APIs that are easy to access and give them the robust technical support to make them usable. This “productization” of APIs (as I blogged about for CA Technologies last year) requires thinking about everything from meeting regulatory requirements to marketing plans for APIs to calculating their ROI.
  4. Do not, as Van Alstyne says, “monetize everything” but give away enough value to drive the volumes of outside partners and end users you need to create a true platform. Google Search is the ultimate example: Free to the end user, which drives the volumes of searches Google needs to profitably sell ads against them and refine further search results.

Of course, not every technology company needs or can be a “platform company.” I also know this scratches the surface of what it takes to market platforms. Let me know what I’ve missed and what’s worked for you.

Author: Bob Scheier
Visit Bob's Website - Email Bob
I'm a veteran IT trade press reporter and editor with a passion for clear writing that explains how technology can help businesses. To learn more about my content marketing services, email bob@scheierassociates.com or call me at 508 725-7258.

Want Good Writers? Make Onboarding Easy

stopwpmadness1Today, I give you an exciting post about how to onboard writers to the content management systems that handle your marketing content.

Bored already? So am I, which is the point.

When you’re trying to develop a lot of marketing content very quickly for the launch of a major B2B Web site (as a Fortune 500 client is doing) a clunky onboarding process will make it harder to lure the writers you need. This is especially true if you’re paying those writers – how do I say this delicately? – less than stellar rates.

Water Torture, CMS Style

This came up because I have a friend who’s editor of a new tech Web site and under pressure to deliver a lot of content quickly.  His budget only lets him pay at a level that makes it hard for writers with busy practices to justify working with him. But he’s a good guy, and his employer is a potential good client, so I want to make it work.

Here, though, is what the client forces me to go through just to enroll in their CMS and start my first piece.

  • Upload a resume and clips. If the editor knows me and trusts me, why force me through this? And why not let me directly upload clips, rather than having to provide them only in link form, which is clunky for content such as white papers I have on my PC but difficult to find on clients’ Web sites?
  • Answer security questions and set up security codes. We’re not launching nuclear weapons or changing the Fed’s interbank lending rate here. We’re assigning marketing collateral. Is there really a threat some imposer will write that ghosted blog post instead of me?
  • Categorize the stories I’ve uploaded. After going through the hassle of uploading a story about, say, different forms of cloud-based developer platforms, the CMS asks me to choose from a long list of categories, including “Travel and leisure,” “Arts and entertainment,” “Food and fitness,” and, by the way, “Information Technology.” If the client is in IT, and I’m an IT writer, why force me to manually tell me again?
  • What language the story is written in: If Google can detect what language a post is in, and offer to translate it for me, why can’t a CMS (in which I’ve already entered my home address and uploaded clips in English) figure this out?
  • Accept a list of terms and conditions, such as that I will agree to “build trust with the reader,” be “straightforward, credible, authentic, witty, opinionated” and “share with readers (how to) address real problems” and to educate the reader. If you have to tell your writers to be clear and helpful, you’re hiring the wrong writers.

Too Much Whining?

Am I whining? Yes. But if a good writer is busy, each of these steps make it less likely they will work with you — especially if you’re trying to hold down the rates this pay them.

Still not convinced? Consider this: Another colleague is going through the onboarding process with another technology giant (whose name you would instantly recognize) that asked him to fill in one form using a typewriter. Beyond the unpaid time it takes to find such a relic, what would a prestigious analyst or industry leader think faced with such a request from you? And what a customer think of you as a tech vendor if they found out you still use typewriters?

CMS onboarding may not be a sexy subject, but trust me: Do it wrong and it will hurt you.

Author: Bob Scheier
Visit Bob's Website - Email Bob
I'm a veteran IT trade press reporter and editor with a passion for clear writing that explains how technology can help businesses. To learn more about my content marketing services, email bob@scheierassociates.com or call me at 508 725-7258.

Does This Pop-Up Make Me Look Fat?

Or, should say, does this pop-up below try to make the reader look stupid?

dont value technology

Or, how about this one:

I DONT NEED TODAYS MOST IMPORTNT NEWS

Or (I can’t resist):

 

It’s Not Me, It’s You. Really.

I usually just look for the “X” so I can close pop-up ads as quickly as I can and get on with what I was reading. But in these cases, and others I’ve seen recently, the “opt-out” line was so insulting I had to do a screen grab.

Assuming these aren’t intentional efforts to grab the reader’s attention, the common message is “Our site is so great there’s no rational reason you wouldn’t want to visit it. You must be stupid, uninformed or irrelevant yourself if you don’t click `yes.’”

Before trying this on your site, ask how you would respond if a sales or marketing person took the same approach with you:

  • Car shopping: Can I put you in this $100,000 Tesla right now, or do you not care about being on the cutting edge of style and technology?
  • In a restaurant: Do you want to try the pickled eel with curried aioli, or do you note like new, intriguing foods?
  • On a date: Do you want to see me again, or are you not interesting in being with the hottest, most fascinating person in the world?

Turn you on, or turn you off? Thought so.

Opting Out Without Put Downs

Seeing how content marketing is supposed to be about nurturing customers who aren’t ready to buy (rather than turning them off), here are some alternative approaches to “opt out” messages.

Don’t want to subscribe now? You can always check out our past posts here. )

               Getting too many newsletters? You can bookmark our site instead…

              Tech news not your thing? Check out our blog on business management…

Respect

Each of these alternative “opt out” lines:

  • Don’t insult the reader for daring to say “no” to your content.
  • Offer the reader other ways to get your content, or
  • Offer other content that better meets their needs.

And isn’t that a better way to nurture and engage prospects who aren’t ready to buy (or even subscribe) than giving them the back of our hand?

Author: Bob Scheier
Visit Bob's Website - Email Bob
I'm a veteran IT trade press reporter and editor with a passion for clear writing that explains how technology can help businesses. To learn more about my content marketing services, email bob@scheierassociates.com or call me at 508 725-7258.

Selling the Five Waves of “Transformation”

How to sell transformation IBM, Dell, Capgemini and Accenture all claim they can deliver it.  McKinsey & Co. claims the entire nation of China is doing it.

“It” is  digital transformation. Personally, I don’t get it, because:

  • If “digital” means “computerized,” we’ve all been “digitally transformed” a bunch of times since the 1960s. (Think mainframe, minicomputer, client-server, Web, and now mobile, social, cloud and Big Data.)
  • And as for transformation, as I’ve argued  repeatedly, this is meaningless jargon unless you say what you’re transforming yourself from and to. Much of the time, “transformation” is just a fancy word for saying “better” or “cheaper.”

Go With the Flow, Bob

Rather than fight the tide, maybe I should accept that “digital transformation” is popular because it speaks to what my clients are trying to tell their prospects. Let’s try riding the wave instead, based on several of the definitions floating around out there:
[table id=1 /]

Note that, while there are common themes across definitions, how much room there is for differentiation based on each specific definition, and the specific strengths you bring to the market.

Breakthrough! Transformation Defined

By making its definition very specific (“The realignment of, or new investment in, technology and business models to more effectively engage digital customers at every touchpoint in the customer experience lifecycle” the Altimeter Group was able to craft a customer survey that uncovered specific, rather than vague, implementation issues.

The “process,” rather than technical issues, uncovered (below) seem to make digital transformation an easier pitch for consultants than hardware or software-centric players, unless they can describe specifically how their skills in areas such as Big Data or business intelligence help organizations better understand today’s mobile and socially-connected customers.

Even One Word Can Help

All this is well and good if you and your prospect agree on a definition for digital transformation.  If you don’t bother defining it, or define it only vaguely, you’re inviting your customers to misunderstand what you’re offering.

nJust changing one word – “digital transformation” to “IT transformation” – means you’re talking about, as Accenture puts it, the need to “…identify which IT capabilities are most critical to the success of the overall enterprise, and shape an IT organization and capability that supports the business cost-effectively.”

That’s what most of my clients mean by “transformation” and it usually boils down to reducing costs through things like virtualization, data center consolidation, and training lower-level or lower-cost offshore staff to handle more complex support requests. That’s all well and good, but it doesn’t deliver the unified customer experience and universal market insights “digital” transformation implies.

Does any of this clear up all this transformation talk or just make it confusing in a new way?

Author: Bob Scheier
Visit Bob's Website - Email Bob
I'm a veteran IT trade press reporter and editor with a passion for clear writing that explains how technology can help businesses. To learn more about my content marketing services, email bob@scheierassociates.com or call me at 508 725-7258.

Making Pesky SME Interviews Worth It

speed B2B marketing content You know how hard it is to get time from your subject matter experts (SMEs) to brief the writer who’s creating your marketing content. These SMEs (be they sales engineers, account executives or project managers) are too busy meeting their numbers or keeping clients happy to explain it all to a writer.

So doesn’t it make sense to prep the SME beforehand so the writer gets the details they need to write a good draft the first time? That saves the SMEs the hassle of a follow-up call, endless emails or trying to rewrite the copy  themselves.

Killer Questions

Based on my experience working with “first drafts” from SMEs, here are seven critical questions they  must be able to answer if you want good, compelling copy to result from the interview.

  1. What were the business (not technology) problems that led the customer to seek your help or buy your product? The writer needs issues a senior executive would understand, such as reduced productivity, excess costs, lost sales or plunging customer satisfaction.
  2. You claim your services were “unique,” “transformational” and “optimized” the client’s operations. Just what makes them unique? What was the “bad” situation the customer was trapped in, and specifically what did you “transform” it into?
  3. Specifically how did you “optimize” your client’s operations, with dollar or percentage metrics of improvements in business areas such as sales, costs, time to market, or customer satisfaction?
  4. If  the client can’t or won’t share numbers with you about the benefits, can you at least describe examples or anecdotes to show the types of problems you solved?
  5. You list the services you provided, the industry standards you comply with, and the software, processes or frameworks you used. How are any of these better/different than what your competitors offer, and how did these help the client?
  6. You keep mentioning acronyms and buzzwords that don’t show up in a quick Google search. Remember, the writer wasn’t part of the project and doesn’t know the jargon you and the customer lived with every day. Spell out every acronym, explain what each means and how each of them helped the client.
  7. And for every phase of the project, every approach you took, every tool you used, what did you do better or differently than your competitors?

Make the Call

One other tip: Get your SME on the phone with the writer, rather than bounce emails back and forth with them. You may think getting the SME’s answers in writing will be quicker, but in my experience that never works. They often keep repeating the same jargon in each round of frustrating emails.

That’s because they are (justifiably) too close to the work, and understand every nuance of it too well to “pull back” and explain them to the writer. In a phone interview, I can insist on that “who cares?” information, and keep asking in real time to be sure I understand it and thus can explain it to your prospects. And I don’t have to keep going back to ask the SME what they really meant.

Added benefit: If an SME feels the writer is making good use of their time, and delivers content that helps them sell to customers, they’re more likely to give you more time for future content development.

What have you done to help streamline briefing calls with marketing writers?

Author: Bob Scheier
Visit Bob's Website - Email Bob
I'm a veteran IT trade press reporter and editor with a passion for clear writing that explains how technology can help businesses. To learn more about my content marketing services, email bob@scheierassociates.com or call me at 508 725-7258.
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