Internet of Things marketingRemember all the dumb ideas that crashed and burned in the Internet bubble? Think Pets.com, based on the idea that consumers would rather order heavy packages of pet food online, pay delivery charges and wait for it rather than just pick it up at a local store.

It took years for businesses like Amazon to show how the Web should really be done. We’re in much the same place today with the Internet of Things (IoT) — the hundreds of millions of devices (from appliances to fitness monitors to industrial equipment) that will link to the Internet in coming years.

There already are solid business cases for IoT applications. They include early warnings that equipment needs maintenance to prevent breakdowns, or Bluetooth-based locator beacons to track when a customer is about to leave a store so you can text them a last-minute discount.

Then, there are those that are just not thought through yet, and that can make you (or your client) look clueless.

Got Gum?

One example is Trident gum which is partnering with Strap, an IoT-focused startup, and a convenience store chain “to leverage wearable data for brand marketing.”

How will knowing how many steps a customer takes, their calorie burn, or their active and non-active minutes help sell more gum? “We don’t yet know the exact use case,” the CEO of Strap said, though the story noted the parties will take 90 days to “work together to devise a market approach” followed by a pilot early next year.

In other words, nobody knows whether or how this would work – or if they do, they aren’t ready to say. At least one other reader was also confused, asking “…what this can possibly do for a brand like Trident other than give the appearance they are progressive and innovative?”

Pitch Wisely

That’s why pitching far-out experiments like this reads like a flashback to the bad old Internet bubble: Mash a random product (pet supplies or gum) with the latest buzzword (the Web, or the IoT) and see if something fantastic happens.

Trident (and every other company) should absolutely be casting far and wide to see how wearables and other IoT devices can help their business. But if you’re going to promote this work, put it in the proper perspective that shows how you’re being smart and innovative rather than casting about blindly.

Some ideas:

  • Wait till you have something to say. After 90 days of gathering and assessing data, I’ll bet the three parties will have some intriguing ideas about what data will and won’t be useful and some ideas for a pilot. Talking to the press then lets you show true thought leadership and build your brand.
  • Ask for help. Along with describing your internal efforts, sponsor a contest for ideas about what useful apps Trident customers might want on a wearable device or a Hack-a-thon with a prize for coolest app.
  • Share what you already know. I’ll bet the folks at Trident, the start-up and the convenience store chain have some hunches about how data and apps on wearable can sell gum. Describe those in your marketing material and (per step two) and invite feedback. This again shows thought leadership and could prompt some good suggestions.

The failures of early players didn’t stop the Web from changing all our lives, in ways that are still unfolding. The same will be true of the IoT.  Let’s help our clients survive the early stage shake out by being smart about how we position their early-stage IoT experiments.

Author: Bob Scheier
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I'm a veteran IT trade press reporter and editor with a passion for clear writing that explains how technology can help businesses. To learn more about my content marketing services, email bob@scheierassociates.com or call me at 508 725-7258.

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