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how to write a press release There’s a one-sentence error that almost guarantees an editor, blogger or other influencer won’t call for more information, a chat with your CEO or enough details to write about your latest  announcement.

And I’m seeing more and more vendors making this mistake all the time.

The mistake is not in a sentence they include in the press release, but a sentence they leave out.

The missing info is, believe it or not, the name, phone number and email of a person to contact for more information.

Company to Press: Drop Dead?

PR and marketing folks are probably skipping this “For more information….” line because “press” is thought of as old-fashioned or downright obsolete, with bloggers and social media providing the faster path to awareness. Many companies are also cutting back on internal or external PR to save money and figure any calls aren’t worth their time.

Judging from the requests I keep getting for product and company briefings, I “press” exposure is still important. If you don’t agree, why go to the time and trouble of doing a press release at all? If the aim is to get people to notice you and write/blog/Tweet/podcast about you, why wouldn’t you want to make it as easy as possible for them to talk to you?

Even worse is, often, the lack of any easy to find press contact info on company Web sites. More and more, I need to drill deep into the general “Contact Us” page and even go through a drop-down list to find the “press contact” option. The harder you make it for a writer or editor to contact you, the more likely they’ll click through to a competitor who is easier to work with.

Your Real Readers

Remember also that the “press” has expanded far beyond full-time reporters working for name-brand trade or general interest pubs. For example, I’m doing a series for a vendor-sponsored Web site aimed at developers. It’s run by a former trade press editor, the methodology and sourcing are almost identical to common practice on trade pubs, and the stories are informational and objective, not vendor sales puffery.

For the sources I interview for such stories (such as recruiters and Web sites offering salary benchmarks) I’d bet the coverage on this site is just as valuable as if I were writing for a trade pub. It might even be more valuable, as it’s in the vendor’s interest to aggressively promote the content to the target audience. In any case, they seem happy with the links I’ve sent and are lining up to cooperate on future stories.

Given all that, I’m at a loss for why anyone would issue a press release without contact information. Any clues? And check out these other tips for beefing up your press releases.

Author: Bob Scheier
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I'm a veteran IT trade press reporter and editor with a passion for clear writing that explains how technology can help businesses. To learn more about my content marketing services, email bob@scheierassociates.com or call me at 508 725-7258.

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Filed under: Content Marketing For IT VendorsPR/Marketing Writing Tips

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