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What the heck is it we do so well?

The other day, a prospective client realized he wasn’t ready to hire me – or any — content marketing copywriter.

He realized as we spoke that before asking a copywriter to present his message, he and his subject matter experts needed to agree on what their message was. He asked if I had any “documentation” of what questions he and his team needed to answer before hiring a copywriter.

Here are the questions I came up with. Let me know what I missed.

Messaging Questions:

  •  What is our “elevator pitch” – the 30 second description of what we do, why we do it better than our competitors, and why it matters to customers?
  •  What is our specific differentiator vs. our top three competitors? Lower cost? Higher      quality? Better customer service? Proprietary technology? In-depth knowledge of our customers’ industries?
  •  What’s special about how we deliver our specific value? Our bonus system for sales reps tied to long-term customer satisfaction?  Our proprietary testing framework for mobile apps? The fact our CEO is a former customer?
  •  Who are the two or three customer types we need more of? How big are they, what industries are they in, what pain points do they face, what systems are they now running, what competitors are they dissatisfied with?
  •  What tone do we want each piece of content to take? i.e., very technical for lower-level influencers and users, more business-oriented for C-level execs who pay the bills?
  •  What stories can we tell about our success – either customer case studies or internal stories of lessons learned and how we improved processes internally?
  •  What similar products do we not compete with, and what markets do we not want to tackle? (This is great for cutting time, effort and cost out of the process.)

Strategy Questions:

  • What is the goal of this content marketing campaign? How many new customers, how much revenue, how many quality leads?
  • How will we use this content in our sales and marketing activity? Will we direct customers to “landing pages” teased by emails or Tweets? Which of our prospect lists will each piece of content be sent to?
  • What “call to actions” do we want each piece of content to encourage? Signing up for a newsletter, following us on Twitter, downloading a new piece of content or agreeing to a sales call?
  • How will we “score” the leads this program generates? What actions will trigger different scores (i.e., downloading “Introduction to widgets” gives them one point, “How to choose the right widget for you” gives them two points, “Three questions to ask before signing your widget contract” gets them three points.)=
  • Have we asked sales what they need from this campaign, how they would score prospects, and in what form (alerts through our CRM system) they would like to get updates on prospects and their behavior?
  • What marketing automation tools (such as email marketing services or Web site monitoring) do we have, do we need and what new skills would we need to use them more effectively?

You don’t need the final answers to all these questions. But do get enough agreement to move forward with a measurable plan and refine it from there. Let me know which questions worked, or didn’t, for you and which questions I missed.

Author: Bob Scheier
Visit Bob's Website - Email Bob
I'm a veteran IT trade press reporter and editor with a passion for clear writing that explains how technology can help businesses. To learn more about my content marketing services, email bob@scheierassociates.com or call me at 508 725-7258.

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