Is this what they mean by a transformative change?

After being nice and congratulating a vendor for a clear, simple job explaining their value proposition, my dark side takes over as I blast another for a confusing – and potentially damaging — attempt at rebranding.

When business process outsourcing firm Data Dimensions  recently announced a new “Mission, Vision, and Values statement” it totally failed to explain exactly what is new and why anyone should care. As someone who follows the BPO market closely, I was hoping to learn something.

But it was clear Data Dimensions was talking to itself, not its customers, from the very start with the headline “Data Dimensions Looks to the Future with a New Vision.” Unless I’m a Data Dimension employee or customer, why should I care?

The naval-gazing went on as the release explained the company wanted to “make our (vision) statement more in line with who we are and to better clarify our commitment to the clients that we serve, and the people we employ.” If you’re having an internal identity crisis, why publicize the fact, at least without mentioning what’s in this clarification for the customer?

Now, to the “meat” of the news, although there’s not much to chew on. The company’s new mission is — wait for it – to provide “innovative business process solutions (with) an uncompromising commitment to quality, responsiveness, and integrity.” It’s “vision” is “To be the leading solutions provider for every customer we serve!” For this, they wasted valuable Web bandwidth?

Their values (which I’m sure you’ve never heard of before) include “integrity, “excellence,” “innovative” and “responsive.” To make the kitchen sink of jargon complete, they collaborate with each other while recognizing the diverse background of their employees. And since you asked, you’ll be relieved to know “the new Mission, Vision, Values statement is posted throughout our buildings and in key public areas” and that it is actually “a continuation of the principles that Data Dimensions was founded on in 1982.”

Besides failing to explain the importance of this for its customers, Data Dimensions fails to provide any context by explaining what is new, or has changed. This makes me, as a suspicious reader, look between the lines for signals of problems or failures they’re trying to fix. If their values now include “integrity” does that mean they lacked integrity in the past? If they’re now committed to “excellence” and being “innovative” have they not been in the past? If they’ve always had integrity and innovation, why emphasize it now?

It may be wonderful that Data Dimensions went through this internal values clarification, but it’s not, in and of itself, anything the market cares about. It only becomes worth sharing when the company can explain specifically how it will deliver lower-priced, higher-quality, or more innovative services for its customers. Until then, these feel-good generalities teach the customer not to bother reading the next press release they see from this company.

Let me know if you think I’m being too hard on these folks or you want help explaining your own strategic repositioning. 

Author: Bob Scheier
Visit Bob's Website - Email Bob
I'm a veteran IT trade press reporter and editor with a passion for clear writing that explains how technology can help businesses. To learn more about my content marketing services, email bob@scheierassociates.com or call me at 508 725-7258.

Tagged with:

Filed under: PR/Marketing Writing Tips

Like this post? Subscribe to my RSS feed and get loads more!