There is no such thing as "try." You're either generating leads or you're not.

For those of you who’ve been following my “Lone Ranger Content Marketing” blogs you’ll note it’s been quiet for the last few months. Too quiet, as they say in the movies.

The “problem” has been a glut of paying work customers have wanted delivered quickly. This has kept me from doing the hard, patient work required to use marketing automation software to distribute content and identify prospects by tracking what they read. That background work includes building customer personas, creating content to reach each customer type, measuring the readership of that content and then following up with the highest quality leads.

A recent post on the “Marketing Automation Software Guide” site does a great job describing what it really takes to get ROI from marketing automation software. In it, Justin Gray, CEO and chief marketing evangelist of marketing services firm Leaded, tells customer that “If you have all of your content in place and a solid plan, you will start seeing different (better) leads around the six-month mark as nurturing starts to precipitate leads out of the funnel and into sales.

His four pieces of advice, while aimed at larger companies than mine, also speak to a one-person (or similarly understaffed) MA operation:

  1. Get executive buy-in for the purchase you’re about to make…MA can get complicated and take a while to show results. You need the executive suite to fully understand this or they will get impatient, fast. For the one-person shop the “buy-in” means making regular time in your schedule, no matter what, for the MA grunt work regardless of what short-term fires you need to fight
  2. Assemble and assess your content, re-using existing content and building it into your lead scoring by shaping it around the buyer personas you’ve created. For you lone rangers out there, this is part of the background work you need to be doing every day.
  3. Determine milestones. What results do you want, and by when? This is a trial and error process so the plan will probably change quite a bit in the beginning. For sole practitioners (even if they’re working within larger organizations) such external milestones can help restore your focus when several days of urgent work for clients have taken our eye off the MA ball. 
  4. Don’t hand off every single lead to sales, but wait until “they are so hot they’re ready to sign.”  The temptation to “pounce” on a seemingly interested lead is even greater for a sole practitioner grinding away in isolation for months. Again, patience is best so when you do contact a lead, they sign and give you the reinforcement and ROI you really need – new business. 

Justin’s bottom line is that good marketing is hard, and that marketing automation (like other forms of automation) is only as good as the processes it speeds along. For a marketer working for a very small organization, or in isolation within a larger group, it seems the key is to work as slowly and methodically as you need to – but not to stop.

May the force be with you, and may it direct you the post itself here.

Author: Bob Scheier
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I'm a veteran IT trade press reporter and editor with a passion for clear writing that explains how technology can help businesses. To learn more about my content marketing services, email bob@scheierassociates.com or call me at 508 725-7258.

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