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Content marketers generally approach content audits with all the enthusiasm that attends any audit. The very word conjures up stern-looking authority figures thumbing through your records to see where you’ve fallen short.

I’ve been through several content audits myself, mapping the collateral I have against the types of buyers I want to reach, and the stages they’re at in the buying cycle. The good news is that I found a lot more good, and timeless, content than I thought I would. If  you’ve been doing any blogging, white papers, case studies or email newsletters (and who hasn’t?) with any degree of care you must have stumbled on some insights, presented with some degree of style. It’s likely you’ve forgotten half of what you’ve done in the crunch of daily work, another reason the audit might be cause for relief, not grief.

In a recent Webinar with marketing automation firm Manticore, Mike Vannoy, COO of sales and marketing services firm Sales Engine International said this good news can help move you (or your boss) off square one with content marketing by giving you a concrete starting point. Just doing the content audit helped, he said.. “It made is less daunting. We knew where to focus and we found we were in much better shape than we thought we were.” In some cases, less was more, as with case studies. He found readers wanted “a one page case study, short and sweet, to take into their boss” to prove another customer had been successful with Manticore’s platform. Even quick, one to three minute videos were useful as well, he found.

Yet another piece of good news from Manticore’s audit was how much content could be reused, “with with a little bit of freshening up.” One five-year-old white paper, for example, turned out to be “still pretty current” once some minor language changes were made. It also built a promotable blog post around several paragraphs taken from a case study, and in turn used some blog posts as the basis for lead nurturing emails. (A recent guest column on my site explains how to take this even further, essentially creating a book for free out of a carefully planned series of white papers and other collateral.)

But lest you think the whole process was painless, I have found myself in trouble when I found overlaps in some of the categories, and the content, in my audit spreadsheet. If the same article or Webinar or white paper could apply both to “early evaluators” and “financial decision makers,” it showed I hadn’t defined each group and their needs carefully enough. As in so many marketing activities, defining your prospect’s very, very carefully and knowing their needs really, really well at the outset is critical.

Would love to hear your thoughts on how to make content audits less painful and more useful.

Author: Bob Scheier
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I'm a veteran IT trade press reporter and editor with a passion for clear writing that explains how technology can help businesses. To learn more about my content marketing services, email bob@scheierassociates.com or call me at 508 725-7258.

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